GOES-14 SRSO-R: coastal fog/stratus and wildfire activity in the western US

August 17th, 2016 |

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with hourly surface weather symbols plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with hourly surface weather symbols plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 remained in SRSO-R mode on 17 August 2016, providing imagery at 1-minute intervals over the western US. Some interesting phenomena observed included the evolution of coastal fog/stratus in areas such as Vancouver Island and Washington/Oregon (above; also available as a large 134 Mbyte animated GIF) and also the Bay Area of California (below; also available as a large 202 Mbyte animated GIF). In the example above, note the diurnal ebb and flow of fog/stratus as it first moved westward out of, and then eastward back into the Strait of Juan de Fuca.; in the example below, it is interesting to note that as the majority of the coastal fog/stratus dissipated as morning heating/mixing progressed, but a narrow finger of fog/stratus remained in the Golden Gate and protruded into San Francisco Bay.

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

In Southern California, one of the larger wildfires burning at the time was the Blue Cut Fire northeast of Los Angeles. During the early morning hours, GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (below; also available as a large 70 Mbyte animated GIF) revealed the long and narrow smoke plume streaming northeastward; a marked increase in wildfire hot spots (red pixels in the 3.9 µm imagery) was seen after about 17 UTC (10am local time).

GOES-14 0.63 µm Visible (left) and 3.9 µm Shortwave Infrared (right) images, with hourly plots of surface reports in cyan/yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 0.63 µm Visible (left) and 3.9 µm Shortwave Infrared (right) images, with hourly plots of surface reports in cyan/yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

A closer view of GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images (below; also available as a large 127 Mbyte animated GIF) after 18 UTC (11am local time) showed a more well-defined smoke plume re-develop as the wildfire continued to burn with very little perimeter containment. The smoke plume drifted over Victorville, California (KVCV), where the surface visibility briefly dropped to 7 miles at 22 UTC (surface observation plot).

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with county outlines and 4-character airport identifiers [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with county outlines and 4-character airport identifiers [click to play MP4 animation]

Flooding in Louisiana

August 12th, 2016 |

Morphed MIRS observations of total precipitable water (TPW), 1500 UTC 11 August - 2100 UTC 12 August [click to play animation]

Morphed MIRS observations of total precipitable water (TPW), 1500 UTC 11 August – 2100 UTC 12 August [click to play animation]

Persistent convection in an atmosphere rich in moisture has led to life-threatening flooding over many Parishes in southern Louisiana. The animation above, taken from images at this site that morphs MIRS estimates of Total Precipitable Water (with values valid over both land and water) shows values around three inches over much of southeastern Louisiana. These TPW values agree with in situ observations such as the radiosonde from New Orleans at 1200 UTC on 12 August, where 2.70″ was observed. 24-hour rainfall totals ending at 1200 UTC on 12 August (Link) show a widespread region of more than 6″; raingauge observations of 6-hour totals at 1200 and 1800 UTC, below, show that the rain continued into the day on 12 August.

GOES-14 Visible (0.62 µm) images, with METAR observations of 6-hour precipitation, 1200 and 1800 UTC on 12 August 2016 [click to enlarge]

GOES-14 Visible (0.62 µm) images, with METAR observations of 6-hour precipitation, 1200 and 1800 UTC on 12 August 2016 [click to enlarge]

The flood-producing thunderstorms were very slow-moving, as evidenced in the animation of Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images from GOES-14, below (GOES-14 is in SRSO-R mode this month). Very little motion occurs in the two hours of this loop (using images at 5-minute time steps).

GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) Imagery, 1625-1830 UTC on 12 August 2016 [click to play animation]

GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) Imagery, 1625-1830 UTC on 12 August 2016 [click to play animation]

The entire sequence of 1-minute interval GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images from 0001-2358 UTC on 12 August is shown below.

GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with surface weather symbols plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with surface weather symbols plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

This event is also discussed at the Satellite Liaison Blog, where the focus is on 1-minute visible imagery from GOES-14 and 1-minute lightning data.

===== 13 August Update =====

GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with hourly surface weather symbols plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with hourly surface weather symbols plotted in yellow [click to play MP4 animation]

The heavy rainfall continued into 13 August, with storm total accumulations exceeding 31 inches in Louisiana (WPC storm summary). The entire sequence of 1-minute interval GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images spanning the period 1115 UTC on 11 August to 2159 UTC on 13 August, above, shows the development of multiple clusters of slow-moving thunderstorms, some of which exhibited cloud-top IR brightness temperatures of -80ºC or colder (violet color enhancement).

Severe turbulence injures 24 on JetBlue Flight 429

August 11th, 2016 |

JetBlue Flight 429 flight path [click to enlarge]

JetBlue Flight 429 flight path [click to enlarge]

JetBlue Flight 429 encountered severe turbulence over south-central South Dakota around 0115 UTC on 12 August (7:15 pm local time on 11 August) 2016, which caused injuries to 22 passengers and 2 crew members (media story). The aircraft (flying from Boston MA to Sacramento CA) had to be diverted to Rapid City SD, as seen on the flight path map above (source: FlightAware.com).

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with pilot reports of turbulence [click to play animation]

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with pilot reports of turbulence [click to play animation]

1-km resolution GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) images (above) showed widespread thunderstorms across the region, with rapidly-developing new cells forming in the vicinity of the turbulence encounter. A Turbulence AIRMET had been issued around 23 UTC for that portion of the flight path, and Convective SIGMETs also advised of the potential for severe thunderstorms with tops above 45,000 feet (JetBlue 429 was cruising at an altitude of 32,000 feet).

The corresponding 4-km resolution GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images (below) indicated that cloud-top IR brightness temperatures were as cold as -54º C (orange color enhancement) just east of the pilot report at 0100 UTC.

GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with pilot reports of turbulence [click to play animation]

GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with pilot reports of turbulence [click to play animation]

1-km resolution POES AVHRR Visible (0.86 µm) and Infrared (12.0 µm) images at 0049 UTC (below) provided a more detailed view of the developing cells less than 30 minutes prior to the turbulence encounter.

POES AVHRR Visible (0.86 µm) and Infrared (12.0 µm) images, with pilot reports [click to enlarge]

POES AVHRR Visible (0.86 µm) and Infrared (12.0 µm) images, with pilot reports [click to enlarge]

Deep cyclone over Hudson Bay

August 11th, 2016 |

GOES-13 Water Vapor (6.5 µm) images, with hourly surface observations [click to play animation]

GOES-13 Water Vapor (6.5 µm) images, with hourly surface observations [click to play animation]

GOES-13 (GOES-East) Water Vapor (6.5 µm) images (above) showed the intensification of a strong cyclone over Hudson Bay, Canada during the 09 August – 10 August 2016 period; the cyclone deepened to a central pressure of 980 hPa (28.94″ of mercury) at 06 UTC on 10 August.

Daily composites of Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) images visualized using RealEarth (below) showed the storm on 08, 09 and 10 August.

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color RGB images [click to enlarge]