Why 1-minute data matters: Beavertails

June 4th, 2015 |
GOES-14 Visible (0.6263 µm) Imagery, 04 June 2015.  1-minute imagery on the left, 5-minute imagery on the right (click to play animation)

GOES-14 Visible (0.6263 µm) Imagery, 04 June 2015. 1-minute imagery on the left, 5-minute imagery on the right (click to play animation)

Beavertails are ephemeral cloud features that form in the inflow of supercell thunderstorms. They are horizontally long and roughly parallel to the inflow warm front. Its appearance (and presence) is affected by and influences inflow into the storm, and by inference, it affects radar returns. That is — a change in the Beavertail cloud can precede a change in radar. Accurate detection of this cloud type, then, aids the understanding of evolving storm morphology. The animation above shows a severe convective system over southeastern Wyoming, viewed at 1-minute intervals (Left) and at 5-minute intervals. Beavertails that form persist for about 30 minutes, so 5-minute imagery will resolve them; however, the resolution of the 1-minute data is far better to monitor the small changes in size and shape that are related to storm inflow.

Do beavertail changes affect the radar? The animation below shows the ProbSevere product readout from 2000-2220 UTC (Courtesy John Cintineo, CIMSS) (Click here for a slow animation). (Click here for an animation (from 1918-2058 UTC) that includes warning polygons). The increases and decreases in the MRMS MESH appear unrelated to the formation/decay of the various beavertails.

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere Product, 2000-2020 UTC on 4 June 2015 (click to animate)

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere Product, 2000-2020 UTC on 4 June 2015 (click to play animation)

This storm was captured by different chasers. This YouTube video from Scott Longmore shows the evolution of the convective system from the ground. Hat/tip to Jennifer Laflin, NWS EAX and Chad Gravelle, OPG, for alerting us to this case.

Why 1-minute data matters: Orphan Anvils

June 4th, 2015 |
GOES-14 Visible (0.6263 µm) Imagery, 11 May 2014.  An orphan anvil is indicated (click to play animation)

GOES-14 Visible (0.6263 µm) Imagery, 11 May 2014. An orphan anvil is indicated (click to play animation)

‘Orphan anvils’ typically will develop before and just as a cap that prevents convective development breaks down. They can therefore be a precursor to strong thunderstorm development. The animation above shows an orphan anvil just before strong convection (Storm Reports) develops over south-central Nebraska. The anvil development is obvious in the 1-minute animation, above. (Click here for an un-annotated, smooth animation). This anvil was mentioned in the SPC Day-1 Convective Outlook updated at 2000 UTC (the 1-minute imagery is called 1km in that outlook).

The animation below compares 1-minute (top), 5-minute (middle) and present 15-minute GOES (bottom) time-steps over northwest Kansas on June 4 2015. It is a straightforward matter to notice the orphan anvils in the 1-minute imagery; it is far more challenging when using the 5-minute time-step and it’s nearly impossible with present-day 15-minute GOES time-steps. In this case, the cap was not broken. (Hat tips to Bill Line, SPC and Chad Gravelle, OPG, for these cases; Click here for additional comments and here for additional information on SRSO-R Operations).

GOES-14 Visible (0.6263 µm) Imagery, 4 June 2015, with 1-minute time-steps (top), 5-minute time-steps (middle) and routine 15-minute GOES time-steps (bottom) (click to play animation)

GOES-14 Visible (0.6263 µm) Imagery, 4 June 2015, with 1-minute time-steps (top), 5-minute time-steps (middle) and routine 15-minute GOES time-steps (bottom) (click to play animation)

Hurricane Blanca in the eastern Pacific Ocean

June 4th, 2015 |
Suomi NPP VIIRS Day Night Band 0.70 µm Visible and 11.35 µm infrared imagery over Blanca, 0829 UTC 4 June 2015 (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day Night Band 0.70 µm Visible and 11.35 µm infrared imagery over Blanca, 0829 UTC 4 June 2015 (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP overflew Hurricane Blanca early in the morning on 4 June, during a near-full Moon, and the Day Night Band imagery, above, toggled with the 11.35 µm imagery, show the hurricane. (Day/night band imagery of the eye is here, the entire storm is here, and zoomed out is here; click for 11.35 µm imagery of the eye, the entire storm, and zoomed out). Deep convection overnight did not wrap all the way around the storm. Evidence of dry air entrained into the circulation is apparent.

GOES-15 Imager 10.7 µm infrared channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-15 Imager 10.7 µm infrared channel images (click to play animation)

The 3-hourly animation of 10.7 micron imagery, above, from 3-4 June 2015 shows Hurricane Blanca southwest of the Mexican coast, drifting southwestward. Cold cloud tops that were apparent at the start of the loop warm by the end, perhaps because convection is being suppressed by the presence of dry air. MIMIC Total Precipitable Water (below) suggests that dry air is being entrained into Blanca’s circulation from the north. (Update on Andres, also apparent in the MIMIC Total Precipitable Water animation: This overlay of Metop ASCAT winds on top of GOES 10.7 imagery from ~0530 UTC on June 4 shows a swirl that is offset from the convection. Andres is forecast to become post-tropical later on June 4.)

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water animation for the 72 hours ending 1300 UTC on 4 June 2015 (click to enlarge)

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water animation for the 72 hours ending 1300 UTC on 4 June 2015 (click to enlarge)

Visible imagery from GOES-13 from June 3 and June 4, below, show a less distinct/cloudier eye on 4 June compared to 3 June. Multiple overshooting tops persist in the circulation of the system, but the coarse 30-minute temporal resolution of the imagery cannot capture the lifecycle of these quickly evolving events.

GOES-13 Imager 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 Imager 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

Water vapor imagery from GOES-13 from June and June 4, below, also confirm a consistently less organized storm. The dry air penetrating from the north is apparent in the imagery, but it appears not to have entered into the circulation of the storm, at least not at levels detected by the water vapor channel.

GOES-13 Imager 6.5 µm infrared water vapor channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 Imager 6.5 µm infrared water vapor channel images (click to play animation)

Morphed Microwave Imagery (MIMIC) from this website shows the evolution of the central eye structure, below. The eyewall that was much closer to the storm center at the start of the animation has been replaced by a weaker, larger eyewall.

Morphed Microwave Imagery, 48 hours ending 1500 UTC 4 June 2015 (click to enlarge)

Morphed Microwave Imagery, 48 hours ending 1500 UTC 4 June 2015 (click to enlarge)

For more information on this storm, please visit the National Hurricane Center website or the SSEC/CIMSS Tropical Weather website.