Vog plume streaming off the island of Hawaii

January 10th, 2013
Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel, 3.74 µm shortwave IR channel, and 11.45 µm IR channel images

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel, 3.74 µm shortwave IR channel, and 11.45 µm IR channel images

A comparison of AWIPS images of Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel, 3.74 µm shortwave IR channel, and 11.45 µm IR channel data (above) showed a broad “vog” plume streaming westward off the Big Island of Hawaii on 10 January 2013. The primary source of this vog plume was likely the active Kilauea volcano — and the 3.64 µm shortwave IR image revealed a small “hot spot” at the summit of the volcano, which exhibited a brightness temperature value of 49.5º C (orange color enhancement).

The VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel image with an overlay of 1-hour interval MADIS atmospheric motion vectors (or “satellite cloud-tracked winds”) showed the typical easterly trade wind flow regime that usually transports the vog plume westward away from the Hawaiian Islands (below). However, synoptic-scale disturbances that disrupt this trade wind flow can cause the vog plume to move over inhabitied portions of the islands, causing air quality problems.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel image + MADIS 1-hour interval atmospheric motion vectors

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel image + MADIS 1-hour interval atmospheric motion vectors

Other examples of Hawaiian vog plumes can be found here on the CIMSS Satellite Blog.