Eruption of the Pavlof Volcano in Alaska

November 15th, 2014
Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band and 3.74 µm shortwave IR images

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band and 3.74 µm shortwave IR images

According to the Alaska Volcano Observatory, an eruption of the Pavlof Volcano began around 01:50 UTC on 13 November 2014. A comparison of nighttime images of Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band (DNB) and 3.74 µm shortwave IR data at 13:07 UTC or 4:07 am local time on 14 November (above) showed the bright glow of the eruption on the DNB image, with the hottest pixel being 52º C (red color enhancement) on the shortwave IR image.

With the subsequent arrival of daylight, a break in the clouds allowed the faint volcanic plume to be observed on GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (below; click image to play animation), drifting northwestward over the Bering Sea.

GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

At 22:02 UTC on 14 November, the radiometrically-retrieved maximum volcanic ash mass loading value was 1.8 tons per km2, the maximum ash height was 16.8 km, and the maximum ash mass effective radius was 7.81 µm (below).

MODIS volcanic ash mass loading, ash height, and ash mass effective radius products

MODIS volcanic ash mass loading, ash height, and ash mass effective radius products

About an hour later, the volcanic ash plume could be seen on a 23:03 UTC Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band image, with a maximum 3.74 µm shortwave IR brightness temperature of 46º C at the summit of the volcano (below).

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band and 3.74 µm shortwave IR images

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band and 3.74 µm shortwave IR images

The brown hue of the volcanic ash plume was very evident on Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) images from the SSEC RealEarth web map server (below).

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color RGB images

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color RGB images

The intensity of the Pavlof eruption increased on 15 November, and a well-defined volcanic ash plume could be seen on GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (below; click image to play animation). Pilot reports estimated that the top of the plume was as high as 38,000 feet.

GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

On a comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel and 11.45 µm IR channel images at 22:45 UTC (below), the coldest cloud-top IR brightness temperature value was -55º C.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel and 11.45 µm IR channel images

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel and 11.45 µm IR channel images

At 22:29 UTC, the CLAVR-x POES AVHRR Cloud Top Temperature product indicated a minimum value of -54º C, with a maximum Cloud Top Height value of 9 km; the -54º C cloud top temperature corresponded to an altitude of around 29,000 feet or 8.7 km on the 16 November/00 UTC Cold Bay AK rawinsonde profile.

POES AVHRR Cloud Top Temperature and Cloud Top Height products

POES AVHRR Cloud Top Temperature and Cloud Top Height products

A Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color RGB image at 23:04 UTC (below) suggested that the volcanic plume consisted of a dense layer of tan-colored ash, with a layer of mostly ice cloud at the top of the plume.

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color RGB image

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color RGB image

Airborne glacial silt from the Copper River Valley in Alaska

October 28th, 2014
GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

McIDAS images of GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel data (above; click image to play animation) showed the hazy signature of airborne glacial silt drifting southward out of the Copper River valley and over the adjacent waters of the Gulf of Alaska on 28 October 2014. The strong winds lofting the silt were very localized to the Copper River valley itself, with cold dense arctic air from further inland (air temperatures were 8 to 10º F at Gulkana, PAGV) accelerating through narrow mountain passes — note how winds at nearby Cordova (PACV) were generally calm during much of the period. As the western edge of the airborne silt reached Middleton Island (PAMD), the surface visibility dropped as low as 5 miles.

AWIPS II images of Suomi NPP VIIRS data provided a better view of the aerial coverage of the glacial silt: a comparison of VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel and 1.61 µm near-IR “snow/ice channel” images (below) showed that the 1.61 µm image offered better contrast to help locate the edges of the feature. This 1.61 µm channel imagery will be available from the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on GOES-R.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel and 1.61 µm near-IR

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel and 1.61 µm near-IR “snow/ice channel” images

Two consecutive VIIRS 1.61 µm images (below) revealed the changes in aerosol coverage between 21:43 UTC and 23:22 UTC.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 1.61 µm near-IR

Suomi NPP VIIRS 1.61 µm near-IR “snow/ice channel” images

The more dense portion of the airborne glacial silt particle feature exhibited a slightly warmer (darker gray) appearance on VIIRS 3.74 µm shortwave IR images, due to efficient reflection of incoming solar radiation.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 3.74 µm shortwave IR images

Suomi NPP VIIRS 3.74 µm shortwave IR images

A VIIRS true-color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) image from the SSEC RealEarth site (below) offered a good view of the coverage of the glacial silt at 21:45 UTC.

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color image

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color image

Re-suspended volcanic ash from the Novarupta volcano in Alaska

September 29th, 2014
GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

McIDAS images of GOES-15 0.63 µm visible channel data (above; click image to play animation) showed the hazy signature of a plume of re-suspended volcanic ash originating from the region of the Novarupta volcano in Alaska, moving southeastward over the Shelikof Strait toward Kodiak Island on 29 September 2014. The 1912 eruption of Novarupta left a very deep deposit of volcanic ash, which often gets lofted by strong winds in the early Autumn months before snowfall covers the ash (another example occurred on 22 September 2013). Surface winds gusted as high as 30 knots at regional reporting stations, with numerical models estimating terrain-enhanced winds as high as 40-50 knots over the Novarupta ash field.

An AWIPS II image of POES AVHRR 0.86 µm visible channel data (below) showed the ash plume at 22:46 UTC; a pilot report at 22:45 UTC indicated that the top of the ash plume was between 4000 and 6000 feet above ground level.

POES AVHRR 0.86 µm visible channel image, with METAR surface reports and Pilot reports (PIREPs)

POES AVHRR 0.86 µm visible channel image, with METAR surface reports and Pilot reports (PIREPs)

A sequence of 3 Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) images from the SSEC RealEarth web map server (below) indicated that the re-suspended ash plume had been increasing in areal extent during that period.

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color images from 27, 28, and 29 September

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color images from 27, 28, and 29 September

A sequence of 4-panel products from the NOAA/CIMSS Volcanic Cloud Monitoring site (below) shows False-color images, Ash/dust cloud height, Ash/dust particle effective radius, and Ash/dust loading (derived from either Terra/Aqua MODIS or Suomi NPP VIIRS data).

4-panel MODIS/VIIRS products: False color image; Ash/dust cloud height; Ash/dust particle effective radius; Ash/dust loading

4-panel MODIS/VIIRS products: False color image; Ash/dust cloud height; Ash/dust particle effective radius; Ash/dust loading

Hat tip to Mark Ruminski (NOAA/NESDIS) for alerting us to this event.

Eruption of the Mount Ontake volcano in Japan

September 27th, 2014
Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color images on 27, 28, and 29 September

Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color images on 27, 28, and 29 September

The Mount Ontake volcano erupted on the main Japanese island of Honshu around 02:52 UTC (11:52 AM local time) on 27 September 2014. A sequence of three daily (27, 28, and 29 September) Suomi NPP VIIRS true-color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) images from the SSEC RealEarth web map server (above) showed the volcanic plume drifting eastward then southeastward during that period. The ash plume disrupted air travel in some parts of Japan.

A comparison of pre-eruption (22 September) and post-eruption (28 September) VIIRS true-color images (below) revealed the light gray signature of thick volcanic ash covering the region around the summit of Mount Ontake. There was also a narrow volcanic plume streaming southeastward on the 28 September image.

22 September vs 28 September VIIRS true-color images

22 September vs 28 September VIIRS true-color images