Derived Motion Winds near the surface with a strong East Coast Storm

March 2nd, 2018 |

GOES-16 ABI Band 10 (Low-Level Water Vapor, 7.3 µm) Infrared Imagery, 0507-1757 UTC on 2 March 2018 (Click to animate)

The evolution of a very strong Nor’easter on the East Coast of the United States for the twelve hours ending at ~1800 UTC on 2 March 2018 is shown above. During this time period, the storm produced winds that shut down schools and Government in the Nation’s Capitol (and elsewhere), with High Wind Warnings widespread from North Carolina to Massachusetts (Link, from this site). Significant Coastal Flooding is likely in New England with this storm.

One of the Level 2 Products produced with GOES-R Series Satellite (GOES-16 and soon, GOES-17) data are Derived Motion Wind Vectors at various levels. The images below show winds of up to 70 knots (!!) at or below 900 hPa over the Chesapeake Bay between 1627 and 1657 UTC on 2 March. Observations (bottom) show numerous surface gusts exceeding 50 knots in the region during that time.

GOES-16 ABI Band 10 (Low-Level Water Vapor, 7.3 µm) Infrared Imagery, 1627 and 1657 UTC on 2 March 2018, with Derived Motion Winds in excess of 50 knots at ~1000 hPa (red) and ~900 hPa (Magenta) plotted (Click to enlarge)

GOES-16 ABI Band 2 (“Red” Visible, 0.64 µm) Visible Imagery, 1502, 1602 and 1702 UTC on 2 March 2018, with surface observations plotted in green (Click to enlarge)

 

Cyclone Kelvin makes landfall in Australia

February 18th, 2018 |

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images, with hourly surface plots at Broome [click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available]

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm, right) images, with hourly surface plots at Broome, Australia [click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available]

Himawari-8 Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above) showed Cyclone Kelvin as it made landfall in Western Australia as a Category 1 storm on 18 February 2018. Kelvin continued to intensify shortly after making landfall, with estimated winds of 80 gusting to 100 knots — and a distinct eye feature could be seen in the Visible and Infrared imagery (as well as Broome radar data).

A longer animation of Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (below) revealed a very large convective burst as Kelvin meandered near the coast early on 17 February — periodic cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures of -90 ºC or colder were seen. After making landfall, the eye structure eventually deteriorated by 18 UTC on 18 February.

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images, with hourly surface plots [click to play MP4 | Animated GIF also available]

Himawari-8 Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images, with hourly surface plots [click to play MP4 | Animated GIF also available]

The MIMIC-TC product (below) showed the development of Kelvin’s compact eye during the 17 February – 18 February period; the eye was well-defined around the time of landfall (2147 UTC image on 17 February), and persisted for at least 18 hours (1556 UTC image on 18 February) until rapidly dissipating by 21 UTC.

MIMIC-TC morphed microwave imagery [click to enlarge]

MIMIC-TC morphed microwave imagery [click to enlarge]

Himawari-8 Deep Layer Wind Shear values remained very low — generally 5 knots or less — prior to, during and after the landfall of Kelvin, which also contributed to the slow rate of weakening. In addition, an upward moisture flux from the warm/wet sandy soil of that region helped Kelvin to intensify after landfall; land surface friction was also small, since that portion of Western Australia is rather flat.

Himawari-8 Water Vapor images, with Deep Layer Wind Shear product [click to enlarge]

Himawari-8 Water Vapor images, with Deep Layer Wind Shear product [click to enlarge]

The eye of Cyclone Kelvin could also be seen in Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) images, viewed using RealEarth (below). The actual times of the Terra and Suomi NPP satellite overpasses were 0154 UTC and 0452 UTC on 18 February, respectively.

Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS True-color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Cyclone Gita in the South Pacific Ocean

February 12th, 2018 |

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, top) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm, bottom) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available]

Himawari-8 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images (above) showed Cyclone Gita as it moved toward Tonga in the South Pacific Ocean during 11 February – 12 February 2018. The tropical cyclone reached Category 4 intensity (ADT | SATCON) near the end of the animation period.

A longer animation of Himawari-8 Infrared images (below) revealed that the center of Gita moved just south of the main island of Tongatapu. Surface observations from Fua’Amotu (NFTF) ended after 0735 UTC.

Himawari-8

Himawari-8 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.4 µm) images, with hourly surface plots [click to play Animated GIF | MP4 also available]

MIMIC-TC morphed microwave imagery (below) showed that Gita underwent an eyewall replacement cycle after moving to the southwest of Tongatapu — a small eyewall was replaced by a larger eyewall, which was very apparent in DMSP SSMIS Microwave (85 GHz) images at 1533 and 1749 UTC.

MIMIC-TC morphed microwave imagery

MIMIC-TC morphed microwave imagery

Metop ASCAT scatterometer surface winds (below) showed Gita around the time that the storm center was just south of Tongatapu at 0850 UTC.

Metop ASCAT scatterometer surface winds [click to enlarge]

Metop ASCAT scatterometer surface winds [click to enlarge]

Storm-force low in the central Atlantic Ocean

January 29th, 2018 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

The compact circulation of an occluded surface low over the central Atlantic Ocean could be seen on GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images on 29 January 2018 (above); surface analyses indicated that the system was producing Storm Force (48-55 knot) winds.

This surface low was located beneath a larger upper-level low, as seen on GOES-16 Low-level (7.3 µm), Mid-level (6.9 µm) and Upper-level (6.2 µm) Water Vapor images (below). Very dry air (yellow to red enhancement) was evident just to the south and southwest of the storm.

GOES-16 Low-level (7.3 µm, left), Mid-level (6.9 µm, center) and Upper-level (6.2 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 Low-level (7.3 µm, left), Mid-level (6.9 µm, center) and Upper-level (6.2 µm, right) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Hourly images of a (preliminary, non-operational) GOES-16 Deep-Layer Wind Shear product (calculated using Low-level and Mid-upper level GOES-16 Derived Motion Winds) are shown below — they revealed that the surface low was protected within the favorable low-shear environment of the upper low circulation, with more unfavorable high values of shear immediately surrounding it.

GOES-16 Deep-layer Wind Shear products [click to play animation]

GOES-16 Deep-layer Wind Shear products [click to play animation]