NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere Product and storms over Texas

April 24th, 2015 |
NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere Output from AWIPS on 24 April, 1902, 1908, 1912, 1930, 1938, 1944, 1948, 1950, 1954 and 1958 UTC (click to play animation)

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere Output from AWIPS on 24 April, 1902, 1908, 1912, 1930, 1938, 1944, 1948, 1950, 1954 and 1958 UTC (click to play animation)

Severe thunderstorms moved across central Texas on April 24th (Link). The NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere product can be used with storms like this to alert a forecaster to when severe weather will develop. ProbSevere output tells you the probability that a given storm cell will first produce severe weather in the next 60 minutes. (The type of severe weather — hail, high winds or tornado) are not specified by the product. In the animation, a strong thunderstorm is just entering Coke county from Sterling county to the north of Tom Green county. The list below shows ProbSevere values with the three storms shown in the animation above.

  1. 1902 UTC  (Northern Cell)  ProbSevere 46%
  2. 1908 UTC (Northern Cell) ProbSevere 50%
  3. 1912 UTC (Northern Cell) ProbSevere 85%
  4. 1930 UTC (Northern Cell) ProbSevere 95%
  5. 1932 UTC (Northern Cell) ProbSevere 95% (Severe Thunderstorm Warning active)
  6. 1948 UTC (Southern Cell) ProbSevere 23%
  7. 1950 UTC (Southern Cell) ProbSevere 50%
  8. 1954 UTC (Middle Cell) ProbSevere 57%
  9. 1956 UTC (Middle Cell) ProbSevere 70%

So, the northern cell crossed the 50% ProbSevere threshold at 1908 UTC, the southern cell crossed the 50% ProbSevere threshold at 1950 UTC, and the small middle cell had a >50% ProbSevere from the start, at 1954 UTC.

Severe hail (1.25″ in diameter) was reported at 1928 UTC (20 minutes after ProbSevere crossed the 50% threshold) 8 miles west (31.89 N, 100.62 W)of Robert Lee, TX (the county seat of Coke County). At 1957 UTC, 1.75″ Hail was reported four miles north (31.94 N, 100.30 W) of Bronte, TX (also in Coke County).

The middle cell in the animation above eventually merged with the southern cell, and intensified. The animation from 1958 through 2014 UTC is below. ProbSevere with the middle storm (that merges with the southern cell) is 70%, rising to 98% at 2014 UTC.

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere Output from AWIPS on 24 April, 1958, 2000, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014 UTC (click to play animation)

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere Output from AWIPS on 24 April, 1958, 2000, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2014 UTC (click to play animation)

At 2015 UTC, the National Weather Service issued a Severe Thunderstorm Warning. At this time, 2.75″ Hail was falling five miles northwest of Tennyson in Coke County. (31.79N, 100.35W). The 2016 UTC ProbSevere output is here.

The ProbSevere product is something that distills many bytes of information: model output that describes the environmental conditions, satellite data that describes the initial growth of convection, and MRMS radar data that captures the present state of a storm. The distilled data can be used to increase the confidence that a severe event will occur within the next 60 minutes.

An animation of the 10.7 µm imagery from 1800 through 2015 UTC is shown below. The locations of the severe hail reports noted above are included on the relevant images.

GOES-13 10.7 Brightness Temperature 1800-2015 UTC on 24 April 2015;  Coke County is highlighted (click to play animation)

GOES-13 10.7 Brightness Temperature 1800-2015 UTC on 24 April 2015; Coke County is highlighted (click to play animation)

Severe thunderstorms in the Midwest

April 9th, 2015 |
GOES-13 0.63 µm visible images, with Cloud-Top Cooling Rate, Overshooting Tops Detection, and SPC storm reports (click to play animation)

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible images, with Cloud-Top Cooling Rate, Overshooting Tops Detection, and SPC storm reports (click to play animation)

A deepening area of low pressure (21 UTC surface analysis) was moving northeastward across the Midwest region of the US on 09 April 2015; GOES-13 0.63 µm visible images combined with the Cloud-Top Cooling Rate and Overshooting Tops Detection products (above; click image to play animation) showed a line of severe thunderstorms which quickly developed along the associated cold frontal boundary as it moved eastward across Iowa and Missouri during the afternoon hours. Cloud-Top Cooling Rates with some of the storms in Missouri were in excess of 50º C per 15 minutes (violet color enhancement) during their early stage of development (18:25 UTC image).

A comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel and 11.45 µm IR channel images at 18:51 UTC or 1:51 PM local time (below) showed that the line of thunderstorms was beginning to produce a number of cloud-to-ground lightning strikes.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.45 µm IR channel image and 0.64 µm visible channel image with cloud-to-ground lightning strikes

Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.45 µm IR channel image and 0.64 µm visible channel image with cloud-to-ground lightning strikes

Focusing our attention on eastern Iowa and northern Illinois — where there were widespread reports of large hail, damaging winds, and tornadoes (SPC storm reports) — the organization of large, discrete supercell thunderstorms can be seen on GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (below; click image to play animation), which exhibited numerous overshooting tops.

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images, with SPC storm reports (click to play animation)

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images, with SPC storm reports (click to play animation)

The corresponding GOES-13 10.7 µm IR channel images (below; click image to play animation) showed that the coldest cloud-top IR brightness temperatures were -67º C (darker black enhancement).

GOES-13 10.7 µm IR images, with Overshooting Top Detection and SPC storm reports (click to play animation)

GOES-13 10.7 µm IR images, with Overshooting Top Detection and SPC storm reports (click to play animation)

The NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere product (below; click image to play animation) gauges the likelihood of a storm first producing severe weather (of any kind) within the next 60 minutes. It combines information about the environment (Most Unstable CAPE, Environmental Shear) from the Rapid Refresh Model, information about the growing cloud (Vertical Growth Rate as a percentage of the troposphere per minute and Glaciation Rate, also as a percentage per minute), and Maximum Expected Hail Size (MESH) from the MRMS. In this event, the ProbSevere product performed well for the storm that spawned the EF-4 tornado, although due to the cloudiness of the satellite scene the ProbSevere model was unable to diagnose vertical growth rate and glaciation rate (which diminished the potential lead-time). Below is a chronological timeline of events for that storm:

2308 UTC: first ProbSevere > 50%
2310 UTC: first ProbSevere > 70%
2311 UTC: NWS Severe T-Storm Warning
2312 UTC: ProbSevere = 88%
2323 UTC: 1.00″ hail 2 SE Dixson (15 min lead-time for ProbSevere@50, 13 min for ProbSevere@70, 12 min for NWS Svr Warning)
2335 UTC: NWS Tornado Warning (ProbSevere = 94%)
2340 UTC: Tornado report 2 NE Franklin Grove

Radar reflectivity with NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere model contours and NWS warning polygons (click to play animation)

Radar reflectivity with NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere model contours and NWS warning polygons (click to play animation)

In spite of widespread cloudiness, the GOES-13 Sounder single-field-of-view Lifted Index (LI), Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), and Total Precipitable Water (TPW) derived product images (below) were able to portray that the air mass in the warm sector of the low ahead of the strong cold front was was both unstable — LI values of -4 to -8º C (yellow to red color enhancement) and CAPE values of 3000-4000 J/kg (yellow to red color enhancement) — and rich in moisture, with TPW values of 30-40 mm or 1.2 to 1.6 inches (yellow to red color enhancement).

GOES-13 Sounder Lifted Index derived product images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 Sounder Lifted Index derived product images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 Sounder Lifted CAPE derived product images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 Sounder CAPE derived product images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 Sounder Total Precipatable Water (TPW) derived product images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 Sounder Total Precipatable Water (TPW) derived product images (click to play animation)

On the following day (10 April), it was cloud-free as the Landsat-8 satellite passed over northern Illinois at 16:41 UTC or 11:41 AM local time — and the 30.2 mile long southwest-to-northeast oriented tornado damage path that produced EF-4 damage and was responsible for 2 fatalities and 22 injuries (NWS Chicago event summary) was evident on 15-meter resolution Band 8 0.59 µm panchromatic visible images viewed using the SSEC RealEarth web map server (below). An aerial survey of part of the tornado damage path can be seen here.

Landsat-8 0.59 µm panchromatic visible image of southwestern portion of tornado damage track (click to enlarge)

Landsat-8 0.59 µm panchromatic visible image of southwestern portion of tornado damage track (click to enlarge)

Landsat-8 0.59 µm panchromatic visible image of northeastern portion of tornado damage path (click to enlarge)

Landsat-8 0.59 µm panchromatic visible image of northeastern portion of tornado damage path (click to enlarge)

A Landsat-8 false-color image (using Bands 6/5/4 as Red/Green/Blue) is shown below. The 2 tornado-related fatalities occurred in Fairdale.

Landsat-8 false-color image (using Bands 6/5/4 as R/G/B)

Landsat-8 false-color image (using Bands 6/5/4 as R/G/B)

On a side note, in the cold (northwestern) sector of the low it was cold enough for the precipitation type to be snow — and up to 4 inches of snow fell in western Iowa. GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (below; click image to play animation) showed the swath of snow cover as it rapidly melted during the daytime hours on 10 April.

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

In fact, the swath of snow cover across eastern Nebraska and western/northern Iowa was also evident on a Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (DNB) image at 08:49 UTC or 3:39 AM local time (below), highlighting the “visible image at night” capability of the DNB (given ample illumination from the Moon).

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band image

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band image

Severe Weather over the Southern Plains

March 25th, 2015 |

The Storm Prediction Center in Norman issued a Moderate Risk of severe weather over the Southern Plains on March 25, 2015. Convective products were available in AWIPS to help monitor the evolution of this event.

Cloud-Top Cooling (10.7 µm imagery) for GOES-13, 1907-2000 UTC on 25 March 2015 (Click to enlarge)

Cloud-Top Cooling (10.7 µm imagery) for GOES-13, 1907-2000 UTC on 25 March 2015 (click to enlarge)

For example, the Cloud-Top Cooling product, above, monitored rapid development of convection over eastern Arkansas just between 1915 and 2000 UTC (the 10.7µm imagery for about the same time is here). Cloud-Top Cooling depicts where the strongest vertical cloud growth is occurring and is most useful for the initiation of the convection (or subsequent re-energized growth). The NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere product, below, can also monitor the evolution of the storm from initial growth through maturity and beyond.

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere Product, 1900-2028 UTC on 25 March 2015 (Click to animate)

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere Product, 1900-2028 UTC on 25 March 2015 (click to animate)

The NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere product gauges the likelihood of a storm first producing severe weather (of any kind) in the next 60 minutes. It combines information about the environment (Most Unstable CAPE, Environmental Shear) from the Rapid Refresh Model, about the growing cloud (Vertical Growth Rate as a percentage of the troposphere per minute and Glaciation Rate, also as a percentage per minute), and Maximum Expected Hail Size (MESH) from the MRMS. The storm over east-central OK, crossing over the border of Arkansas, showed a ProbSevere value of 45% at 2004 UTC and of 87% at 2006 UTC; 1-inch hail was reported with this storm (in Roland, OK) at 2005 UTC, and a Severe Thunderstorm warning was issued at 2026 UTC. AWIPS-2 imagery that includes readouts for this storm are below.

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere product, 2000-2026 UTC on 25 March 2015 (Click to animate)

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere product, 2000-2026 UTC on 25 March 2015 (click to animate)

Suomi NPP overflew the region shortly before convection developed, and the NUCAPS soundings in the clear pre-convective air described the thermodynamics of the environment. The location of the NUCAPS soundings are shown below, overlain on top of the Suomi NPP VIIRS visible imagery. The Red and Yellow stars show two sounding locations to be discussed. It’s helpful when using NUCAPS soundings to know surface values of temperature and dewpoint, because it can be helpful to adjust the NUCAPS soundings so that surface values are more in line with observations as reported by METARS. Accordingly, the VIIRS visible image with surface METARS plotted is here. Dewpoints in eastern OK and western AR are close to 60 F/15 C.

NUCAPS Sounding Locations at 1833 UTC on 25 March 2015;  Red and Yellow Stars indicate sounding locations described below (Click to enlarge)

NUCAPS Sounding Locations at 1833 UTC on 25 March 2015; Red and Yellow Stars indicate sounding locations described below (Click to enlarge)

The soundings from the two starred sites are below. In both cases, the original sounding and a sounding that has been modified by increasing the lowest dewpoint by 2 C are shown. Most Unstable CAPE for the plotted soundings (original and modified) are indicated. NUCAPS Soundings suggest greater instability over west-central/northwest Arkansas than over southwestern Arkansas.

NUCAPS Sounding at the red star location, both original and modified (Click to enlarge)

NUCAPS Sounding at the red star location, both original and modified (Click to enlarge)

NUCAPS Sounding at the yellow star location, both original and modified (Click to enlarge)

NUCAPS Sounding at the yellow star location, both original and modified (Click to enlarge)

A short (1900-2015 UTC) GOES-13 visible image animation as the convection started is shown below. Click here for a longer animation (1300 – 2345 UTC); Click here for a faster version of the 1300-2345 UTC animation.

GOES-13 Visible 0.65 µm Imagery (Click to animate)

GOES-13 Visible 0.65 µm Imagery (Click to animate)

[Added: This severe weather outbreak caused the first tornado fatality of 2015, in Tulsa County, OK. Satellite imagery of those storms can be found here. ProbSevere product animations from 2024 to 2230 UTC on 25 March and also from 2206 UTC on 25 March to 0012 UTC on 26 March are shown below]

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere product, 2024-2230 UTC on 25 March 2015 (Click to animate)

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere product, 2024-2230 UTC on 25 March 2015 (click to animate)

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere product, 2206 UTC on 25 March 2015 to 0012 UTC on 26 March 2012 (Click to animate)

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere product, 2206 UTC on 25 March 2015 to 0012 UTC on 26 March 2015 (click to animate)

Strong convective winds over Arkansas

July 23rd, 2014 |
GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

Arkansas and surrounding states experiences strong convectively-forced winds on July 23 2014 (SPC Storm Reports for the day are shown below). The visible imagery, above, shows the merging of two convective systems: one is moving south-southeastward through eastern Kansas and one is building southwestward from the lower Ohio River Valley into northern Arkansas. (Mesoscale Discussions for this event were issued from SPC at 1656 UTC, 1827 UTC and 2001 UTC on the 23rd).

Storm Reports from 23 July 2014

Storm Reports from 23 July 2014

GOES-13 Sounder DPI Lifted Index (click to play animation)

GOES-13 Sounder DPI Lifted Index (click to play animation)

Analyses from the GOES-13 Sounder (above) showed the atmosphere into which the convective features were building to be very unstable. A large area with Lifted Indices around -10 (light red) is present; values exceed -12 (purple) at 1800 UTC. GOES Sounder DPI Analyses of CAPE (Convective Available Potential Energy, below) (from this site) likewise show strong instability at the start of the day. Convection is initially at both ends of the area of most unstable air; by 1900 UTC, the end of the animation, it has overspread the entire region of instability.

GOES Sounder CAPE (click to play animation)

GOES Sounder CAPE (click to play animation)

GOES-13 10.7 µm infrared channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 10.7 µm infrared channel images (click to play animation)

The GOES-13 Infrared Imagery, above, likewise shows the convective systems from Kansas and from the lower Ohio Valley merging over Arkansas.

Suomi-NPP VIIRS data were available over Arkansas on two successive passes on 23 July, at 1829 UTC and 2010 UTC, and these high-resolution infrared images show the quick development and vigor of the convection. The high resolution allowed for the detection of very cold cloud tops at 2010 UTC; minimum values were near -88ºC! Coldest GOES-13 10.7 Brightness Temperatures at 2015 UTC (not shown) were -78ºC.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.35 µm infrared channel images (click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.35 µm infrared channel images (click to enlarge)

The storms produced considerable lightning as well, as shown in the animation below that overlays hourly lightning strikes on top of the Suomi NPP 11.35 µm imagery: there were 5800 strikes (400 positive) in the hour ending at 1800 UTC, and 12000 strikes (800 positive) in the hour ending at 2000 UTC!

Suomi NPP 11.35 µm infrared channel imagery and Detected Lightning (click to play animation)

Suomi NPP 11.35 µm infrared channel imagery and Detected Lightning (click to play animation)

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere showed values from 80-95% at the leading edge of the convection as it moved southward through Arkansas. In this event, satellite data were not available as one of the ProbSevere predictors because of the widespread cirrus shield. MRMS Mesh was generally in the 3/4″ to 1-1/2″ range; that combines with model CAPE values exceeding 4000 and generous shear lead to the high ProbSevere values.

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere display including MRMS Base Reflectivity, 1922-2128 UTC 23 July 2013 (click to play animation)

NOAA/CIMSS ProbSevere display including MRMS Base Reflectivity, 1922-2128 UTC 23 July 2013 (click to play animation)

Overshooting Tops, such as those apparent in the 11.35 µm imagery from Suomi NPP, above, can be detected automatically in GOES-13 10.7 µm imagery. The animation of auto-detected overshooting tops, below, from this site, shows a peak in convective intensity (as measured by the number of overshoots) between 2000 and 2100 UTC on the 23rd. This image shows the daily sum of detected overshoots. There is good spatial correlation between that image and the storm reports.

Overshooting Tops Detected from GOES-13, 1545-2300 UTC 23 July 2013 (click to play animation)

Overshooting Tops Detected from GOES-13, 1545-2300 UTC 23 July 2013 (click to play animation)

Finally, CRiS/ATMS data can be used to generate soundings (NUCAPS Soundings) that are available in AWIPS II. The image below shows the spatial coverage of soundings at 2000 UTC on 23 July. The NUCAPS sounding from the easternmost column, third point south of the Oklahoma/Texas border, bottom, is shown at the bottom of the post. The boundary layer of this sounding is too cool and dry — the surface temperature is around 80º F and the surface dewpoint is in the mid-60s. Consequently, the MUCAPE is far too small (about 120 J per kilogram). If the sounding is edited so that surface values are closer to observations (it was 90º F with a 75º F dewpoint in Texarkana at this time) then MUCAPE values jump to near 5000. The sounding is also too dry; the precipitable water is 1.45″ vs. an actual value closer to 2″ at this time.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.35 µm Imagery at 2010 UTC, with NUCAPS Sounding Locations in Green (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP VIIRS 11.35 µm Imagery at 2010 UTC, with NUCAPS Sounding Locations in Green (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP NUCAPS Sounding at 32.7º N, 94.9º W (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP NUCAPS Sounding at 32.7º N, 94.9º W (Click to enlarge)