Matthew along the east coast of Florida

October 7th, 2016 |

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) Imagery, 1230-1337 UTC (Click to enlarge)

Hurricane Matthew is on a path that parallels the coast of Florida, with the center remaining just offshore. GOES-13 Visible imagery from a 1-hour time period this morning, above, shows the continued development of convection around the eyewall and the motion of convective bands inland. GOES-13 Visible images with hourly surface winds and wind gusts (in knots) are shown below. The highest wind gust recorded along the central Florida coast was 107 mph (NWS Melbourne PNS).

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 um) images, with hourly surface winds and gusts in knots [Click to play animation]

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 um) images, with hourly surface winds and gusts in knots [Click to play animation]

A 24-hour animation of morphed Microwave imagery (from this site), below, suggests that an eyewall replacement cycle has completed: the very small eye present at storm’s center at the start of the animation has been replaced by a larger-diameter eye at the end of the animation. Storm strength typically drops during eyewall replacements. Note also that the microwave data shows that the strongest convection remained offshore.

mimic_microwave_24hending1100utc07october

Morphed Microwave Imagery of Matthew showing Strongest Convection, 1200 UTC 06 October to 1100 UTC 07 October 2016 (Click to enlarge)

Infrared imagery from GOES-13, below, also shows the coldest cloud tops to the east of the eye (indicated by the arrow in the image).

GOES-13 Infrared (10.7 µm) Imagery, 1355 UTC. The flashing arrow points to Matthew’s eye (Click to enlarge)

A longer animation of GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 um) images with hourly surface winds and wind gusts (in knots) is shown below (MP4 | animated GIF).

GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 um) images [Click to play animation]

GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 um) images [Click to play animation]

A toggle between Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 um) and Infrared Window (11.45 um) images at 1751 UTC is shown below; Matthew was a Category 3 hurricane at that time.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 um) and Infrared Window (11.45 um) images [Click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 um) and Infrared Window (11.45 um) images [Click to enlarge]

Hurricane Matthew moves into the Bahamas

October 5th, 2016 |
morphedmw_matthew_last48hrs_ending5oct_1000

Morphed Microwave Imagery showing the eye of Matthew from 1400 UTC 3 October through 1345 UTC 5 October (Click to enlarge)

The animation of Matthew, above, from morphed microwave imagery (from this site), shows the toll that interaction with the high terrain of Hispaniola and eastern Cuba has had on the storm (causing it to be downgraded from Category 4 to Category 3 intensity). The formerly distinct eye had eroded, although eye re-formation occurs at the end of the animation. Once again, a comparison of microwave vs infrared imagery revealed that the well-defined eye structure was much more apparent using microwave data. Strengthening/Re-organization of Matthew in the near term will be governed by Sea Surface Temperatures (that are warm) and wind shear (shown below, from this site, that is weak).

wg8shr_0900_5october2016

Diagnosed wind shear, 0900 UTC on 5 October 2016 (Click to enlarge)

Total Precipitable Water fields (from this site, using data from here), below, show abundant moisture surrounding Matthew at its present position. There is dry air over the eastern United States landmass, however.

Morphed Total Precipitable water from MIRS, 1300 UTC 4 October – 1200 UTC 5 October (Click to enlarge)

Morphed Total Precipitable water from MIRS, 1300 UTC 4 October – 1200 UTC 5 October (Click to enlarge)

During the morning and afternoon hours, the satellite presentation of Matthew began to slowly improve on GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) and Infrared Window (10.7 µm) imagery, below (MP4 | animated GIF), with well-defined convective bursts seen later in the day. Note: the noise seen on the 1645 UTC images was due to solar RFI.

GOES-13 0.63 µm Visible (left) and 10.7 µm Infrared Window (right) images [Click to play animation]

GOES-13 0.63 µm Visible (left) and 10.7 µm Infrared Window (right) images [Click to play animation]

Hurricane Matthew

September 30th, 2016 |

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) imagery, 1115 UTC on 30 September 2016 [Click to enlarge]

GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) imagery, 1115 UTC on 30 September 2016″

Early morning visible imagery over Matthew, above, from GOES-13, shows a circular storm with many overshooting tops and no apparent eye. However, Microwave imagery, below, from GCOM at about 0620 UTC, shows an eye structure beneath the clouds. (Information on AMSR-2 is here; Imagery was produced using Polar2Grid, part of CSPP, the Community Satellite Processing Package). Matthew is forecast to turn north and move over the Greater Antilles, threatening Jamaica, Hispaniola and Cuba from Sunday to early Tuesday. More information is available at the National Hurricane Center website.

GCOM AMRS-2 Brightness Temperatures at 36.5 and 89.0 GHz, 0620 UTC on 30 September 2016 [Click to enlarge]

GCOM AMRS-2 Brightness Temperatures at 36.5 and 89.0 GHz, 0620 UTC on 30 September 2016 [Click to enlarge]”

One benefit of Polar2Grid is that it puts different satellite imagery on the same grid, and therefore an animation of Polar data can be produced. The 10.8 µm window channel animation below has imagery from the AVHRR on METOP-A (1349 UTC) and METOP-B (1441 UTC) (Imagery from NOAA-18 (1030 UTC) was projected onto a different grid). A Visible image toggle using data from METOP-A and METOP-B is here.

10.8 µm brightness temperatures from AVHRR on METOP-A (1349 UTC) and METOP-B (1441 UTC) on 30 September 2016 [Click to enlarge]

10.8 µm brightness temperatures from AVHRR on METOP-A (1349 UTC) and METOP-B (1441 UTC) on 30 September 2016 [Click to enlarge]”


===== Update, 1800 UTC =====
Visible imagery from GOES-13 (below) shows the development of an eye. Matthew continues its motion to the west-southwest in between Colombia and Hispaniola.

GOES-13 Visible 0.63 µm Imagery, 1345-1715 UTC on 30 September 2016 [Click to enlarge]

GOES-13 Visible 0.63 µm Imagery, 1345-1715 UTC on 30 September 2016 [Click to enlarge]”

===== Update, 22 UTC 01 October =====

GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation]

GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images [click to play animation]

According to the NHC, Hurricane Matthew reached Category 5 intensity around 00 UTC on 01 October (public advisorydiscussion). An animation of GOES-13 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images from 09 UTC on 30 September to 18 UTC on 01 October, above, showed the evolution of cold cloud-top brightness temperatures surrounding the small eye during the period of rapid intensification (SATCON)  on 30 September – 01 October.

Interestingly, the center of what had since been downgraded to a Category 4 Matthew did a circular loop during the daylight hours of 01 October, as seen in a 2-panel comparison of GOES-13 Visible (0.63 µm) and Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, below.

GOES-13 0.63 µm Visible (left) and 10.7 µm Infrared Window (right) images [click to play animation]

GOES-13 0.63 µm Visible (left) and 10.7 µm Infrared Window (right) images [click to play animation]

One important point about the location of Matthew:


It is because of this southerly location that the storm was not adequately sampled within the CONUS scan sector (which was being provided with imagery as often as every 5-7 minutes, since GOES-13 was in Rapid Scan Operations mode) — so imagery of Matthew was only available every 30 minutes from the Northern Hemisphere scan sector. Once GOES-R becomes operational, a full disk scan can be performed as freqently as once every 5 minutes, which would provide much better sampling for an important tropical cyclone such as Matthew.

GOES-14 SRSO-R: Tropical Disturbance near the Caribbean

August 25th, 2016 |

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animated gif]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animated gif]

GOES-14 SRSO-R Imagery is being produced over the Greater Antilles on 25 August 2016 to monitor a tropical wave (Invest 99L) that is moving towards Florida and the southeast United States. The visible animation above shows a highly sheared system: a low-level circulation center (LLCC) is evident north of Hispaniola and east of the Turks and Caicos, but strong convection (overshooting tops are readily apparent) is displaced well to the east of the system. There is also considerable convection over Hispaniola.

A 2-panel comparison of GOES-14 Visible and Infrared Window images, below (also available as a large 200 Mbyte animated GIF), provided a slightly closer view of the LLCC feature.

GOES-14 0.63 µm Visible (top) and 10.7 µm Infrared Window (bottom) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 0.63 µm Visible (top) and 10.7 µm Infrared Window (bottom) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Wind shear analyses from the CIMSS Tropical Weather site, below, show the surface circulation is within a small ribbon of relatively strong shear. Development chances will increase if the wind shear relaxes. A GOES-13 Visible image with overlays of satellite winds and wind shear is available here.

Wind Shear Analysis, 1200 UTC on 25 August 2016 [click to play animated gif]

Wind Shear Analysis, 1200 UTC on 25 August 2016 [click to enlarge]

Metop-A overflew the system at about 0200 UTC on 25 August (link to orbit path), and winds near Tropical Storm Force cover a wide swath of the southwestern Atlantic. Even if this system does not develop into a Tropical Depression, gusty winds and abundant moisture (see the animation of MIRS Total Precipitable Water from this site, below) herald a weekend when it’s appropriate to pay attention to the weather because of the potential for rain and winds.

Morphed Observations of Total Precipitable Water from MIRS, 0000 UTC 24 August - 1500 UTC 25 August [click to play animated gif]

Morphed Observations of Total Precipitable Water from MIRS, 0000 UTC 24 August – 1500 UTC 25 August [click to play animated gif]

===== 28 August Update =====

GOES-14 0.63 µm Visible (top) and 10.7 µm Infrared Window (bottom) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 0.63 µm Visible (top) and 10.7 µm Infrared Window (bottom) images [click to play MP4 animation]

Invest 99L developed into Tropical Depression 09 around 21 UTC on 28 August. A comparison of 1-minute GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) and Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, above (also available as a large 94 Mbyte animated GIF), showed the tropical depression as it moved westward through the Florida Straits.