Eruptions of Kilauea in Hawai’i

May 5th, 2018 |

GOES-15 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-15 Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play MP4 animation]

Heightened seismic activity of the Kilauea volcano on the Big Island of Hawai’i had been ongoing since April 2018, but increased further in early May leading to a series of minor eruptions (Hawaiian Volcano Observatory | USGS) — and GOES-15 (GOES-West) Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images (above) showed the nearly persistent thermal anomaly or “hot spot” (dark black to red enhancement) during the 03-05 May period. Among the numerous earthquakes, the strongest was an M6.9 which occurred at 2233 UTC on 04 May.

A nighttime image of Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) data viewed using RealEarth (below) revealed the bright glow from Kilauea, and also from the Leilani Estates subdivision where several fissure vents had opened (forcing some evacuations).

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day.Night Band (0.7 µm) images, with island boundary and Google Maps labels [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images, with the island boundary and Google Maps labels [click to enlarge]

A comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band images from 03 May and 04 May (below) showed the before/after difference in the bright signal emitted by the fissure vents near Leilani Estates.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images from 03 May and 04 May [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images from 03 May and 04 May [click to enlarge]

===== 06 May Update =====

Eruptions of fissure vents became more continuous in the Leilani Estates subdivision on 06 May. A comparison of GOES-15 Visible and Shortwave Infrared images (below) showed a long volcanic plume streaming southwestward, with robust thermal anomaly activity at the plume source.

http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/blog/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/G15_VIS_SWIR_HI_06MAY2018_960x640_B12_2018126_201500_0002PANELS_00002.GIF

GOES-15 Visible (0.63 µm, left) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, right) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play animation | MP4]

An Aqua MODIS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image (below) provided a more detailed view of the volcanic plume at 0007 UTC on 07 May. Note the cluster of red thermal anomalies in the vicinity of the Leilani Estates subdivision (the source of the plume).

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS True-color RGB image, with VIIRS thermal anomalies plotted in red [click to enlarge]

Valley fog and mountain snow in the Catskills of New York

May 1st, 2018 |

As pointed out by NWS Binghamton, valley fog and higher-elevation snow cover was apparent on GOES-16 (GOES-East) Visible imagery in the Catskills of southeastern New York on the morning of 01 May 2018. A closer view comparing GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) and Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) images (below) showed the dissipation of the valley fog, followed by the melting of the snow cover in higher terrain (snowfall amounts of up to 3-4 inches fell in the area on 29 April). The Snow/Ice imagery was helpful in discriminating between the brighter valley fog features and the darker snow cover.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm, right) images, with hourly plots of surface reports [click to play animation | MP4]

A 250-meter resolution Terra MODIS True-color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) image acquired from the SSEC Direct Broadcast ground station (below) showed the remaining snow cover over the Catskills (near the center of the image) at 1539 UTC.

Terra MODIS True-color image [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS True-color image [click to enlarge]

Refinery Explosion and Fire in Superior WI

April 26th, 2018 |

GOES-16 ABI “Red Visible” (0.64 µm) from 1532-2027 UTC on 26 April 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Explosions at an oil refinery in Superior WI on 26 April 2018 (news link) produced a black plume of smoke visible in the GOES-16 “Red Visible” Band, the highest resolution (0.5 km at nadir) band on GOES-16. The plume is first visible at about 1717 UTC, and it then streams southeastward over northwest Wisconsin. Areas immediately downwind of the refinery were evacuated due to air quality concerns.

The explosion and subsequent fire was not sufficiently hot to be detected by the shortwave infrared 3.9 µm channel on GOES-16. However, the smoke plume is obvious in this animation, cooler than the background by 3-4ºC, and yellow in the enhancement chosen.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm, left) and Near-Infrared “Vegetation” (0.86 µm, right) images [click to animate]

The dark smoke plume was also evident on Near-Infrared “Vegetation” (0.86 µm) images (above), aided by the additional contrast between the dark plume and the lighter gray appearance of the land surface.

GOES-16 Natural Color images [click to animate]

GOES-16 Natural Color RGB images [click to animate]

The GOES-16 Natural Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) product (above) was also useful for identifying and tracking the smoke plume.

Aqua MODIS True Color and False Color RGB images [click to enlarge]

Aqua MODIS True Color and False Color RGB images [click to enlarge]

250-meter resolution Aqua MODIS True Color and False Color images from the MODIS Today site (above) provided a detailed view of the smoke plume at 1842 UTC. In the False Color image, snow cover and lake ice appear as shades of cyan.

ACSPO SSTs in AWIPS at WFO Guam

April 24th, 2018 |

ACSPO SSTs constructed from AVHRR, MODIS and VIIRS data from various overpasses at Guam on 18 April 2018 (Click to enlarge)

Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs) produced from the Advanced Clear-Sky Processor for Oceans (ACSPO) are now being created in real time at the National Weather Service Forecast Office on Guam (where the National Weather Service day begins). The algorithm is applied to data broadcast from polar orbiter satellites and received at the Direct Broadcast antenna sited at the forecast office.  Because there are so many polar orbiters broadcasting data — NOAA-18, NOAA-19, Metop-A, Metop-B, Suomi-NPP, Terra, Aqua — cloudy pixels on one pass are typically filled in with data from a subsequent pass.  When ACSPO software for NOAA-20 is available, data from that satellite will be incorporated as well.  The result is a very highly calibrated, accurate depiction of high spatial resolution tropical Pacific SSTs.  A composite created every 12 hours from the imagery is also available at the forecast office.