Significant rainfall event in California

December 2nd, 2014
MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product, with surface analysis overlays

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product, with surface analysis overlays

As of 25 November 2014, much of the state of California was experiencing extreme to exceptional drought conditions.  However, the development of a large occluded mid-latitude cyclone over the far eastern Pacific Ocean during the 01 December – 02 December time period began to draw high values (up to 60 mm or 2.4 inches, darker red color enhancement) of total precipitable water (TPW) northward from the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), as seen on AWIPS images of the MIMIC TPW product (above). While the rainfall was beneficial in terms of drought mitigation, amounts of up to 12 inches did cause flooding and mudslide problems in some locations.

An animation of hourly MIMIC TPW images from 30 November – 02 December (below; click image to play animation) showed the northward surge of moisture toward the California coast, and also hinted at a complex inner structure associated with the occluded low.

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product (click image to play animation)

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product (click image to play animation

Comparison of MODIS 6.7 um and GOES-15 6.5 µm water vapor channel images

Comparison of MODIS 6.7 um and GOES-15 6.5 µm water vapor channel images

On 02 December, comparisons of AWIPS II images of 1-km resolution MODIS 6.7 µm and 4-km resolution GOES-15 6.5 µm water vapor channel data around 11 UTC (above) and around 22 UTC (below) demonstrated the importance of improved spatial resolution for more clearly identifying some of the smaller-scale structure features within the core of the occluded low.

Comparison of MODIS 6.7 µm and GOES-15 6.5 µm water vapor channel images

Comparison of MODIS 6.7 µm and GOES-15 6.5 µm water vapor channel images

A comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel and 11.45 µm IR channel images at 22:18 UTC (below) shows a few areas of embedded convection, some of which had produced cloud-to-ground lightning strikes in the hour preceding the images.

Suomi NPP VIIS 0.64 µm visible channel and 11.45 µm IR channel images, with cloud-to-ground lightning strikes

Suomi NPP VIIS 0.64 µm visible channel and 11.45 µm IR channel images, with cloud-to-ground lightning strikes

Major lake effect snow event downwind of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario

November 18th, 2014
GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

Cold arctic air (surface air temperatures in the upper teens to lower 20s F) flowing across the still-warm waters of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario (sea surface temperature values as warm as the middle to upper 40s F) were 2 ingredients that helped create a major lake effect snowfall event on 18 November 2014 (VIIRS visible image with surface analysis). Storm total snowfall amounts were as high as 65 inches in Erie County, New York (NWS Buffalo Public Information Statement). GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (above; click image to play animation) showed the large and well defined single-band lake effect cloud features that developed over each of the lakes. The band over Lake Erie was nearly stationary for several hours, producing snowfall rates as high as 4 inches per hour at some locations in the Southtowns of Buffalo. The stationary behavior (and very sharp northern edge, due to a “locked thermal convergence zone“) of the Lake Erie snow band was quite evident on composite radar reflectivity (below; click image to play animation; images courtesy of the College of DuPage). The formation and growth of this band benefited from a long fetch of southwesterly winds oriented along the axis of Lake Erie.  Isolated negative cloud-to-ground lightning strikes were observed at 16:45 and 22:15 UTC, implying the presence of embedded pockets of thundersnow.

Composite radar reflectivity (click to play animation)

Composite radar reflectivity (click to play animation)

A comparison of Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel and 11.45 µm IR channel images at 18:17 UTC or 1:17 pm local time is shown below. The coldest cloud-top IR brightness temperature was -37º C (green color enhancement), which corresponded to a pressure of 437 hPa (or an altitude around 6 km) on the 12 UTC Buffalo NY rawinsonde report.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel and 11.45 µm IR channel images

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.64 µm visible channel and 11.45 µm IR channel images

Comparisons of Terra and Aqua MODIS true-color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) images covering the Lake Erie/Lake Ontario region along with a high-resolution view centered on Buffalo NY are shown below.

Terra and Aqua MODIS true-color RGB images

Terra and Aqua MODIS true-color RGB images

Terra and Aqua MODIS true-color RGB images

Terra and Aqua MODIS true-color RGB images

A 15-meter resolution Landsat-8 0.59 µm panochromatic visible channel image from the SSEC RealEarth web map server (below) showed great detail to the Lake Ontario snow band as it was moving inland over the Watertown NY area at 15:45 UTC.

Landsat-8 0.59 µm panochromatic visible image

Landsat-8 0.59 µm panochromatic visible image

Looking back to the preceding nighttime hours, a toggle between Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band, 3.74 µm shortwave IR, 11.45 µm IR, and 11.45-3.74 µm IR brightness temperature difference “Fog/stratus product” images at 06:54 UTC or 1:54 am local time (below) showed that the lake effect bands were already well-developed, with minimum 11.45 µm IR brightness temperatures of -30º C and colder (yellow color enhancement). Even with minimal lunar illumination — the Moon was in the Waning Crescent phase, at only 7% of full — the lake effect cloud bands features could still be seen on the Day/Night Band image.

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band, 3.74 µm shortwave IR, 11.45 µm IR, and

Suomi NPP VIIRS 0.7 µm Day/Night Band, 3.74 µm shortwave IR, 11.45 µm IR, and “Fog/stratus product” images

For a more in-depth discussion of this lake effect snow event, watch the VISIT Satellite Chat session.

Mesoscale Convective System over the Southern Plains

October 6th, 2014
<strong>Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.70 µm), Infrared Imagery (11.45 µm) and Day/Night Band imagery with lightning strikes at 0842 UTC on 6 October 2014</strong> (click to animate)

Suomi NPP VIIRS Day/Night Band (0.70 µm), Infrared Imagery (11.45 µm) and Day/Night Band imagery with lightning strikes at 0842 UTC on 6 October 2014 (click to animate)

The Suomi NPP VIIRS image toggle, above, from the pre-dawn hours (3:42 am local time) on 6 October 2014 shows a 0.7 µm Day/Night Band image and an 11.45 µm Infrared image, along with observations of postive and negative lightning strikes. With ample illumination by moonlight, the “visible image at night” Day/Night Band image highlighted areas of convective overshooting tops, but also included bright horizontal stripes that are associated with intense lightning activity; after scanning a particularly bright area of lightning in Arkansas, this image also showed a darker “post-saturation recovery” stripe downscan (to the southeast), which stretched from central Arkansas into Mississippi. This vigorous convective system dropped southeastward from Oklahoma towards the Gulf of Mexico, eventually becoming a Quasi-Linear Convective System (QLCS) which produced hail and wind damage (with one fatality) across parts of northeastern Texas and far northwestern Louisiana (SPC storm reports).

GOES Sounder DPI Lifted Index (click to animate)

GOES Sounder DPI Lifted Index (click to animate)

The southward-dropping Mesoscale Convective System followed a channel of unstable air as diagnosed by the GOES Sounder, above. Note that the Lifted Index values were smaller (less instability) along the path that the system had moved. Total Precipitable water was also enhanced in that corridor, suggesting a region where moisture return from the Gulf of Mexico was ongoing and concentrated.

GOES Infrared Imagery(10.7 µm) at 1600 UTC, and Pilot Reports of Turbulence (click to enlarge)

GOES Infrared Imagery (10.7 µm) at 1600 UTC, and Pilot Reports of Turbulence (click to enlarge)

Mesoscale Convective Systems can exhibit signatures that suggest the presence of turbulence in the atmosphere. In the GOES-13 IR image above, parallel filaments or “transverse bands” of cirrus  (extending approximately north-south) on the poleward side of the MCS suggest the presence of turbulence, and scattered pilot reports of Moderate Turbulence confirm that. Visible MODIS Imagery, below, also shows the transverse bands, as well as the outflow boundary arcing from Houston to the northwest and north.

Terra MODIS visible imagery (0.65 µm) at 1705 UTC  (click to enlarge)

Terra MODIS visible imagery (0.65 µm) at 1705 UTC (click to enlarge)

An animation of hourly GOES-13 Visible imagery, below, shows the motion of the western portion of the outflow boundary as the decaying QLCS moved into the Gulf of Mexico.

GOES-13 Visible (0.65µm) imagery (click to animate)

GOES-13 Visible (0.65µm) imagery (click to animate)

GOES-13 6.5 µm water vapor channel imagery, below, displayed a signature of subsidence immediately upstream of the dissipating MCS, in the form of an arc of warmer/drier (yellow to orange color enhancement) brightness temperatures that extended from the Texas coast into central Arkansas. One rapidly-developing convective cell which formed along the advancing outflow boundary was responsible for severe turbulence in eastern Texas; the subtle signal of the westward-propagating outflow boundary could also be followed on the water vapor imagery.

<strong>GOES-13 6.5 µm water vapor channel images, with pilot reports of turbulence</strong> (click to play animation)

GOES-13 6.5 µm water vapor channel images, with pilot reports of turbulence (click to play animation)

NASA Global Hawk flight to study Tropical Storm Dolly

September 2nd, 2014
NASA Global Hawk flight path, with Cloud Height, Tropical Overshooting Tops, and Lightning data (click to play animation)

NASA Global Hawk flight path, with Cloud Height, Tropical Overshooting Tops, and Lightning data (click to play animation)

The NASA Global Hawk aircraft are once again being used to study tropical cyclones during the 2014 season. As part of CIMSS participation in GOES-R Proving Ground activities, a Global Hawk flight path tool was developed to display important parameters such as ACHA Cloud Top Height, Tropical Overshooting Tops, and lightning (above; click image to play animation). Global Hawk pilots use this product to navigate the aircraft around locations of potential turbulence.

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (click to play animation)

To support the Global Hawk investigation of Tropical Storm Dolly on 02 September 2014, the GOES-13 satellite was placed into Rapid Scan Operations (RSO) mode to provide images at 5-7 minute intervals. GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images (above; click to play animation) and 10.7 µm IR channel images (below; click to play animation) are shown which cover the 3-hour period of the Global Hawk flight segment shown above. There is evidence of overshooting tops seen in the visible imagery, with cloud-top IR brightness temperatures of -80º C and colder (purple color enhancement).

GOES-13 10.7 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)

GOES-13 10.7 µm IR channel images (click to play animation)