Hurricane Earl makes landfall in Belize

August 4th, 2016 |
GOES-14 10.7 µm Infrared Window images, hourly from 0115 through 1015 UTC on 4 August 2016 [click to play animation]

GOES-14 10.7 µm Infrared Window images, hourly from 0115 through 1015 UTC on 4 August 2016 [click to play animation]

Hurricane Earl made landfall around 0600 UTC on 4 August in Belize. The hourly animation from GOES-14, above, shows a rapid warming of the coldest cloud tops over Earl after landfall, as commonly happens. GOES-14 is out of storage to support SRSO-R Operations beginning Tuesday August 9.

The GOES-14 image at landfall shows coldest cloud tops on the north side of the storm. A timely Metop-A overpass (times available at this site) from several hours before landfall provided ASCAT winds, below, that also show strongest winds to the north side of this storm.

Metop-A ASCAT Scatterometer Winds, 0238 UTC 4 August 2016 [click to enlarge]

Metop-A ASCAT Scatterometer Winds, 0238 UTC 4 August 2016 [click to click to enlarge]

Although the strong winds of Earl have diminished now that the storm is over land, Total Precipitable Water values, below, (showing MIRS data, available at this site) remain high and flooding continues to be a threat. Earl is forecast to move along the southern tip of the Bay Campeche starting tomorrow. For more details see the National Hurricane Center website.

Morphed MIRS Total Precipitable Water, 0600 UTC on 4 August 2016 [click to enlarge]

Morphed MIRS Total Precipitable Water, 0600 UTC on 4 August 2016 [click to click to enlarge]

Three geostationary satellites viewed Earl as it moved across the southern Yucatan peninsula. GOES-15, GOES-14 and GOES-13 visible imagery from near 1200 UTC is shown below.

GOES-15, GOES-14, GOES-13 (left, center,right) Visible Imagery of Earl over Belize and Mexico, ~1200 UTC on 4 August 2016 [click to enlarge]

GOES-15, GOES-14, GOES-13 (left, center,right) Visible Imagery of Earl over Belize and Mexico, ~1200 UTC on 4 August 2016 [click to click to enlarge]

Two Geostationary Satellites viewing a system approximately equidistant from both satellites allowed for stereoscopic imagery to be created, below.

GOES-13 and GOES-14 Visible Imagery (0.62 µm), 1415 - 2115 UTC on 4 August 2016 [click to play animation]

GOES-13 and GOES-14 Visible Imagery (0.62 µm), 1415 – 2115 UTC on 4 August 2016 [click to play animation]

GOES-14 is out of Storage

August 1st, 2016 |

 

GIA14_01AUG2016_20N_85W_UPDATE

GOES-14 Imager Channels at 1755 UTC on 1 August 2016 [Click to enlarge]

GOES-14 has again been reactivated, and is distributing data from its location over the Equator at 105 W. GOES-14 will be entering SRSO-R mode next week, starting on 9 August (link) and continuing through 26 August.

Short animations of GOES-14 Visible (0.63 um) and Infrared Window (10.7 um) imagery are shown below.

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 um) images [click to play animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 um) images [click to play animation]

GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 um) images [click to play animation]

GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 um) images [click to play animation]

A 3-panel comparison, below, shows Idaho/Montana wildfire smoke plumes as viewed from GOES-15 (GOES-West), GOES-14 and GOES-13 (GOES-East). The images are displayed in the native projection of each satellite.

GOES-15 (left), GOES-14 (center) and GOES-13 (right) Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation]

GOES-15 (left), GOES-14 (center) and GOES-13 (right) Visible (0.63 µm) images [click to play animation]

GOES-14 SRSO-R: severe thunderstorms in parts of the Midwest and the Southern Plains

May 11th, 2016 |

GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with parallax-corrected SPC storm reports [click to play animation]

GOES-14 Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images, with parallax-corrected SPC storm reports [click to play animation]

The GOES-14 satellite remained in Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R (SRSO-R) mode for part of the day on 11 May 2016; Infrared Window (10.7 µm) images (above) showed the nocturnal development of a severe thunderstorm ahead of an approaching occluded front (surface analyses) that dropped large amounts of hail in the northwestern section of Omaha, Nebraska (station identifier KOMA), stripping trees of foliage and clogging some city streets (even requiring the use of snow plows and shovels: photo 1 | photo 2). The storm began to exhibit an “enhanced-V” signature just prior to the time that it started producing large hail in Omaha. Note: the plotted location of the SPC storm reports on this animation (and all animations on this blog post) have been parallax-corrected, moving them slightly north-northeastward to match the location of cloud top features having a mean altitude of 10 km. The letters UNK after a W wind report denotes “unknown intensity”.

During the late afternoon and early evening, GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images (below; also available as a large 59 Mbyte animated GIF) revealed additional thunderstorms which produced hail and damaging winds across eastern Missouri and southern Illinois (SPC storm reports). These storms fired along an outflow boundary left in the wake of another mesoscale convective system (MCS)  that moved through the region earlier in the day.

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with parallax-corrected SPC storm reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with parallax-corrected SPC storm reports [click to play MP4 animation]

Side note: there was a planned outage of GOES-14 SRSO-R imagery from 1059-2119 UTC. During this time, the GOES-13 (GOES-East) satellite had been placed into Rapid Scan Operations (RSO) mode, providing images as frequently as every 5-7 minutes. Visible (0.63 µm) images (below) showed the mesoscale convective system that produced hail as large as 4.0 inches in diameter in the St. Louis, Missouri area.

GOES-13 visible (0.63 µm) images, with parallax-corrected SPC storm reports [click to play animation]

GOES-13 visible (0.63 µm) images, with parallax-corrected SPC storm reports [click to play animation]

Finally, late in the day another MCS developed in North Texas, just west of the Dallas/Fort Worth area. GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images with parallax-corrected SPC storm reports (below; also available as a large 54 Mbyte animated GIF) showed the large hail and damaging winds produced by this storm. One feature of interest was the “storm-top plume” that emanated from the largest cluster of overshooting tops, and was blown northeastward.

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with parallax-corrected SPC storm reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with parallax-corrected SPC storm reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 SRSO-R: severe thunderstorms in Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma

May 9th, 2016 |

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 um) images, with SPC storm reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with SPC storm reports [click to play MP4 animation]

Widespread severe thunderstorms (SPC storm reports) developed across Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma in the warm sector of a surface low centered over western Kansas (surface analyses) on 09 May 2016. The GOES-14 satellite was operating in Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R (SRSO-R) mode, providing images at 1-minute intervals; Visible (0.63 µm) images with overlays of SPC storm reports covering Nebraska/Kansas (above; also available as a large 133 Mbyte animated GIF) and Kansas/Oklahoma (below; also available as a large 130 Mbyte animated GIF) showed the development of the convection during the 1845 UTC to 0115 UTC (3:45 pm to 8:15 pm local time) period. The first EF4-rated tornado of the 2016 season (which was responsible for 1 fatality) occurred near Katie, Oklahoma; hail was as large as 4.25 inches in diameter Nebraska and 4.0 inches in Oklahoma.

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 um) images, with SPC storm reports [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-14 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with SPC storm reports [click to play MP4 animation]