Category 4 Hurricane Jose approaches the Leeward Islands

September 8th, 2017 |

GOES-16 Clean Window (10.3 µm) Infrared Imagery, 1715 UTC on 8 September 2017 (Click to enlarge)

 

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

Hurricane Jose is approaching the Leeward Islands, following Irma’s path through the region earlier in the week. The Category 4 storm is shown above in 10.3 µm Infrared Imagery from GOES-16. Its satellite presentation is excellent. Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) Lightning data (from this site) plotted on top of ABI Visible (0.64 µm) Imagery is shown below.

3-minute Aggregates of GLM Group Lightning plots and ABI Visible imagery (0.64 µm) at 15 minute intervals, 2 hours ending 1745 UTC on 8 September 2017 (Click to enlarge)

 

Cirrus outflow from Hurricane Irma is visible in the Visible/GLM animation above over and to the west of the Lesser Antilles.  That shear is not yet affecting Jose.

For more information on Jose, consult the webpages of the National Hurricane Center, or the CIMSS Tropical Weather Website.

Hurricane Irma north of Hispaniola

September 7th, 2017 |

GOES-16 Low-Level Water Vapor Infrared (7.34 µm) Imagery, 0737 – 1232 UTC on 7 September 2017 (Click to animate)

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

GOES-16 Captured very strong Hurricane Irma, north of Hispaniola, early on the day on 7 September. The 7.34 µm channel shown is sensitive to water vapor, that is, water vapor in the atmosphere absorbs energy at 7.34 µm. The animation shows the storm moving steadily to the west-northwest. A far less-organized Hurricane Katia is over the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, with a strong jet extending from Katia northeastward along the east coast. A short animation of Visible Imagery with Geostationary Lightning Mapper data, below, from 1015-1230 UTC, shows considerable lightning activity continuing in the eye of the storm and in some of the convective bands that surround it.

GOES-16 Visible (0.64 µm) Imagery at 15-minute intervals underneath plots of GLM Group Activity in 3-minute intervals, 1015-1230 UTC 7 September 2017 (Click to animate)

Suomi NPP overflew Irma at about 1800 UTC on 7 September. Visible (0.64 µm) and Infrared (11.45 µm) imagery from the VIIRS Instrument on Suomi NPP is below.

Suomi NPP VIIRS Visible (0.64 µm) imagery, 1808 UTC on 7 September 2017 (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP VIIRS Infrared (11.45 µm) imagery, 1808 UTC on 7 September 2017 (Click to enlarge)

Category 5 Hurricane Irma over the Lesser Antilles

September 6th, 2017 |

Suomi NPP’s Day Night Band Image, below, from Real Earth, shows Hurricane Irma as it is over the island of Barbuda — note that the island is entirely within the eye! (Click here for an image with no underlying maps).

Suomi NPP Day Night Band Visible (0.7 µm) image, 0529 UTC on 6 September 2017, with underlying map (Click to enlarge)

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

GOES-16 Clean Window (10.3 µm) imagery at 30-second intervals, 0957 – 1202 UTC on 6 September 2017 (Click to animate)

GOES-16 Clean Window (10.3 µm) imagery, above, for two hours near sunrise on 6 September 2017 show a well-developed Irma moving through the islands to the east of Puerto Rico. The storm maintains its excellent satellite presentation with a distinct eye. Geostationary Lightning Mapper Data overlain on the 10.3 µm imagery (with a greyscale enhancement), below, shows that lightning continues to be active within the eyewall of this strong storm.

GOES-16 10.3 µm imagery at 15-minute intervals, with Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) data overlain at 3-minute intervals, yellow oldest, red newest (Click to animate)

For the latest on this powerful storm, consult the National Hurricane Center website, or the CIMSS Tropical Weather Website.

Irma is a Category 5 Hurricane as it approaches the Lesser Antilles

September 5th, 2017 |

GOES-16 Visible 0.64 µm Imagery, 1144-1243 UTC on 5 September 2017 (Click to animate)

GOES-16 data posted on this page are preliminary, non-operational and are undergoing testing

Hurricane Irma, northeast of Antigua and Barbuda in the Lesser Antilles, achieved Category 5 status on 5 September, based on aircraft reconnaissance. The symmetric storm with a clear eye (that includes mesoscale vortices) is shown above with 1-minute imagery from GOES-16.

GOES-16 Geostationary Lightning Mapper data, below, shows lightning occurring in the outer bands of the storm. Two-hour animations, updated every 15 minutes, of GLM data superimposed over Visible (0.64 µm) or over Infrared (10.3 µm) imagery. are available at the links (Imagery courtesy Dave Santek, SSEC).

Note that a slightly later animation, ending at 1500 UTC, (here), shows considerable lightning activity in the eye of Irma, as does the animation ending at 1915 UTC (here). It is not unusual for strengthening tropical systems to support electrical activity in the eyewall.

GOES-16 ABI Visible (0.64 µm) every 15 minutes, 1100-1315 UTC 5 September 2017, with 3-minute increments of GLM Group data plotted (Yellow Points: oldest; Red Points: Latest) (Click to enlarge)

Suomi NPP overflew Irma near 0600 UTC on 5 September, when Irma was still a Category 4 storm. Two views of the storm are shown below, both toggling between the Day Night Band visible image (0.7 µm) that has excellent illumination from a near-Full Moon and the 11.45 µm Infrared Imagery.

Suomi NPP Day Night Band Visible (0.7 µm) and VIIRS Infrared (11.45 µm) imagery, 0554 UTC 5 September 2017 (Click to enlarge)

 

Suomi NPP Day Night Band Visible (0.7 µm) and VIIRS Infrared (11.45 µm) imagery, 0554 UTC 5 September 2017, over the eye of Hurricane Irma (Click to enlarge)

 

A GOES-16 late in the day on 5 September, below, shows a well-developed storm with a distinct eye

GOES-16 Infrared Imagery (10.3 µm, upper left; 6.19 µm, upper right, 7.34 µm, lower right) and Visible Imagery (0.64 µm, lower right), 2057-2143 UTC on 5 September 2017 (Click to animate)

Interests throughout the Greater Antilles, the northern Lesser Antilles, the Bahamas and the southeastern United States including Florida should be monitoring this storm closely, and preparing for its arrival. For more information, refer to the National Hurricane Center website, or the CIMSS Tropical Weather Website.