Large hail in Texas

April 6th, 2019 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with GLM Groups plotted in cyan and SPC storm reports plotted in red [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images with plots of GLM Groups (above) showed a large and electrically-active Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) which produced hail up to 4.5 inches in diameter (SPC storm reports) in eastern Texas on 06 Aprill 2019. These severe thunderstorms intensified generally along and north of a quasi-stationary frontal boundary (surface analyses).

The corresponding GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (below) showed that cloud-top infrared brightness temperatures associated with the strongest overshooting tops were around -70ºC (dark black enhancement). Earlier that afternoon, a higher spatial resolution Suomi NPP VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) image at 1950 UTC showed brightness temperatures as cold as -77ºC just northeast of where 2.0-inch diameter hail was reported at Marquez — located approximately midway between station identifiers KLHB and KPSN — at 2015 UTC. Assuming the 00 UTC Lake Charles sounding was representative of the air mass these storms were developing in, the -77ºC temperature would be at an altitude over 1 km higher than the Most Unstable parcel’s Equilibrium Level.

GOES-16 "Clean" Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images, with GLM Groups plotted in beige and SPC storm reports plotted in cyan [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images, with GLM Groups plotted in beige and SPC storm reports plotted in cyan [click to play animation | MP4]

With better cloud-top shadow contrast, GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) images (below) were helpful to locate the presence of Above-Anvil Cirrus Plume (AACP) features with the 2 strongest cells — and a comparison with 10.3 µm Infrared images indicated slightly warmer brightness temperatures with these AACPs (for example, at 2244 UTC and  0005 UTC).

GOES-16 Near-Infrared "Snow/Ice" (1.61 µm) images, with SPC storm reports plotted in red [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm) images, with SPC storm reports plotted in red [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 All Sky Total Precipitable Water (TPW) and Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) products (below) showed the areal coverage and trends in moisture and instability across the region on that day.

GOES-16 All Sky Total Precipitable Water (TPW) images [click to play animation]

GOES-16 All Sky Total Precipitable Water (TPW) product [click to play animation]

 

GOES-16 All Sky Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) product [click to play animation]

GOES-16 All Sky Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) product [click to play animation]

Hurricane Force low off the US East Coast

April 2nd, 2019 |

GOES-16 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) showed a cluster of deep convection just to the north of the center of a rapidly-intensifying midlatitude cyclone (surface analyses) off the coast of North Carolina on 02 April 2019. In addition, convection was later seen developing along the north-south cloud band marking the leading edge of the cyclone’s cold front. The rapid deepening of this hurricane force low easily met the criteria of a bomb cyclone — its central pressure dropped 20 hPa in just 12 hours (from 1004 hPa at 18 UTC on 02 April to 984 hPa at 06 UTC on 03 April).

The primary convective cluster began to exhibit a large amount of lightning after 1830 UTC, as seen in plots of GOES-16 GLM Groups (below). To the east of this intensifying convection, one ship report at 18 UTC included winds from the east at 50 knots — in addition, a moderate to heavy shower of hail was being reported and their surface visibility was restricted to 1.25 miles (18 UTC surface analysis).

GOES-16 "Red" Visible (0.64 µm) images, with GLM Groups and surface wind gusts plotted in red [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with GLM Groups and surface wind gusts plotted in red [click to play animation | MP4

There were several factors pointing to the development of a sting jet with this storm, as discussed here and here. GOES-16 Low-level (7.3 µm), Mid-level (6.9 µm) and Upper-level (6.2 µm) Water Vapor images (below) revealed distinct areas of warming/drying (darker shades of yellow to orange) that possibly highlighted rapidly-descending air associated with a sting jet (for example, on the 1946 UTC images).

GOES-16 Low-level (7.3 µm), Mid-level (6.9 µm) and Upper-level (6.2 µm) Water Vapor images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 Low-level (7.3 µm), Mid-level (6.9 µm) and Upper-level (6.2 µm) Water Vapor images [click to play animation | MP4]

After 23 UTC, GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (below) portrayed the formation of a large eye-like feature indicative of a warm seclusion (00 UTC surface analysis). Lightning activity remained very high during that time.

GOES-16 "Clean" Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images [click to play MP4 animation]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]


A comparison between 1-km resolution Terra MODIS Infrared Window (11.0 µm) imagery at 0237 UTC with an Aqua MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product at 1755 UTC on the following afternoon (below) showed that the storm intensified and formed the large eye-like feature over the northern portion of the axis of warmest Gulf Stream water (where SST values were in the 70-76ºF range).

Terra and Aqua MODIS Infrared Window (11.0 µm) images from 0237 UTC and 0649 UTC, along with the Aqua MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product at 1755 UTC [click to enlarge]

Terra MODIS Infrared Window (11.0 µm) image at 0237 UTC, along with the 1755 UTC Aqua MODIS Sea Surface Temperature product [click to enlarge]

With a nighttime overpass of the NOAA-20 satellite at 0651 UTC, the eye-like feature was apparent in VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) and Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images (below). Although the Moon was in the Waning Crescent phase (at only 8% of Full), that illumination with the aid of airglow was sufficient to provide a useful “visible image at night” using the Day/Night Band; a streak of bright pixels was due to intense lightning activity within a line of thunderstorms just ahead of the cold front. Note: the NOAA-20 images are incorrectly labeled as Suomi NPP.

NOAA-20 VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µµ) and Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS Infrared Window (11.45 µm) and Day/Night Band (0.7 µm) images, with an overlay of the 06 UTC surface analysis [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 GLM signature of a meteor over Florida

March 30th, 2019 |

GOES-16 Near-Infrared "Snow/Ice" (1.61 µm, left), Near-Infrared "Cloud Particle Size" (2.24 µm, center) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, right) images, with 1-minute plots of GLM Events [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm, left), Near-Infrared “Cloud Particle Size” (2.24 µm, center) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm, right) images, with 1-minute plots of GLM Events [click to enlarge]

A sequence of three GOES-16 Near-Infrared “Snow/Ice” (1.61 µm), Near-Infrared “Cloud Particle Size” (2.24 µm) and Shortwave Infrared (3.9 µm) images with 1-minute plots of GLM Events (above) showed the brief signature of a meteor over the Florida Panhandle during the 0353-0354 UTC time period on 31 March, or 11:53-11:54 PM Eastern Daylight Time on 30 March 2019. The bright meteor signature was captured over northern Taylor County, northwest of the Perry-Foley Airport (station identifier K40J) — the GLM Events are plotted at their approximate location on the Earth’s surface (using the default GLM parallax correction).

The GOES-16 ABI instrument was scanning that portion of the Florida Panhandle at 03:52:54 UTC, slightly earlier than the time that the fireball flash was sensed by the GLM instrument, so no corresponding thermal signature was evident in the infrared imagery.

Tropical Storm Iba off the coast of Brazil

March 24th, 2019 |

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with GLM Groups plotted in red [click to play animation | MP4]

1-minute Mesoscale Domain Sector GOES-16 (GOES-East) “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images (above) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images (below) showed the formation of Tropical Storm Iba off the east coast of Brazil at 16 UTC on 24 March 2019 (surface analyses). Plots of GLM Groups revealed some intermittent lightning activity. Tropical cyclones in the South Atlantic basin are rare — the last was in 2010, and only one example (Catarina in March 2004) is known to have reached hurricane intensity.

GOES-16 "Clean" Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images [click to play animation | MP4]

A toggle between NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) from RealEarth (below) showed Iba at 1610 UTC.

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1610 UTC [click to enlarge]

NOAA-20 VIIRS True Color Red-Green-Blue (RGB) and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images at 1610 UTC [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Infrared images with an overlay of deep-layer wind shear valid at 18 UTC from the CIMSS Tropical Cyclones site (below) revealed a very tight gradient of shear over Iba. However, the shear gradient began to relax somewhat by 21 UTC.

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) images, with an overlay of 18 UTC deep-layer wind shear [click to enlarge]

In a sequence of GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) and Infrared-Water Vapor (10.3-6.9µm) brightness temperature difference (BTD) images (below), the clusters of deep convection propagating southward — east of Iba’s center of circulation, denoted by “I” — exhibited large negative BTD values (darker shades of red) suggestive of significant cloud-top penetration into the lower stratosphere (reference).

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm) and Infrared-Water Vapor (10.3-6.9µm) BTD images [click to enlarge]

GOES-16 Visible images with an overlay of 1138 UTC ASCAT surface scatterometer winds from the Metop-A satellite (below) showed speeds in the 40-49 knot range (yellow barbs).

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) images, with Metop-A ASCAT winds at 1137 UTC [click to enlarge]

The MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product (below) showed that Iba was embedded within a plume of moisture that extended southeastward off the coast of Brazil.

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation]

MIMIC Total Precipitable Water product [click to play animation]

Sea Surface Temperature values (below) were around 30ºC in the waters where Iba intensified.

Sea Surface Temperature analysis at 2230 UTC on 23 March [click to enlarge]

Sea Surface Temperature analysis at 2230 UTC on 23 March [click to enlarge]

===== 25 March Update =====

GOES-16

GOES-16 “Red” Visible (0.64 µm) with GLM Groups (left) and “Clean” Infrared Window (10.3 µm, right) images [click to play animation | MP4]

A comparison of GOES-16 Visible and Infrared images (above) showed that increasing deep-layer wind shear had exposed the low-level circulation center of Iba. However, GLM Groups plotted on the Visible images revealed an increasing amount of lightning activity associated with a convective burst that began to wrap around the southern edge of the storm center after 15 UTC — and a brief cloud-top infrared brightness temperature of -90ºC (yellow pixel embedded with darker purple shades) was seen at 1635 UTC.

A timely overpass of the Suomi NPP satellite at 1639 UTC provided 375-meter resolution VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images (below), which showed a large overshooting top that exhibited infrared brightness temperatures of -90ºC and colder (yellow), with a warmer ring of compensating subsidence immediately surrounding it. The coldest pixel had a brightness temperature of -103.7ºC — which is almost 1ºC colder than the -102.96ºC value noted over Australia in 2008.

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

Suomi NPP VIIRS True Color RGB and Infrared Window (11.45 µm) images [click to enlarge]

The explosive growth of that convective burst was very apparent in a toggle between VIIRS Infrared images from NOAA-20 at 1549 UTC and Suomi NPP at 1639 UTC (below, courtesy of William Straka, CIMSS). Note that the images use a slightly different variant of the color enhancement. A comparison of VIIRS True Color and Infrared images from NOAA-20 and Suomi NPP viewed using RealEarth is available here.

VIIRS Infrared (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 at 1549 UTC and Suomi NPP at 1639 UTC [click to enlarge]

VIIRS Infrared (11.45 µm) images from NOAA-20 at 1549 UTC and Suomi NPP at 1639 UTC [click to enlarge]