Smoke dissipation via downdrafts from a collapsing thunderstorm

June 17th, 2011 |
POES AVHRR 10.8 µm IR images

POES AVHRR 10.8 µm IR images

AWIPS images of POES AVHRR 10.8 µm IR data (above) showed a thunderstorm that was moving off the Georgia/Florida coast during the pre-dawn hours on 17 June 2011. Rapidly-warming cloud top IR brightness temperatures indicated that this thunderstorm was quickly dying.

A POES AVHRR false color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) image at 12:36 UTC (below) depicted a well-defined outflow boundary resulting from the downdrafts of the collapsing thunderstorm — and to the east of the storm, the hazy signature of residual smoke from wildfires that had been burning across the region during previous days.

POES AVHRR false color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) image

POES AVHRR false color Red/Green/Blue (RGB) image

McIDAS images of GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel data (below) showed that a great deal of the smoke east of the storm was apparently dissipated by cleaner downdraft air from the dying convection.

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images

GOES-13 0.63 µm visible channel images

This clearing of the smoke was also apparent on a MODIS true color image from the SSEC MODIS Today site (below).

MODIS true color image

MODIS true color image

For additional images and information, see the US Air Quality “Smog Blog”.

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