Strong storm in the Bering Sea

November 26th, 2017 |

Himawari-8 Lower-level (7.3 µm, left), Mid-level (6.9 µm, center) and Upper-level (6.2 µm, right) Water Vapor images, with hourly surface wind gusts (knots) plotted in red [click to play MP4 animation]

Himawari-8 Lower-level (7.3 µm, left), Mid-level (6.9 µm, center) and Upper-level (6.2 µm, right) Water Vapor images, with hourly surface wind gusts (knots) plotted in red [click to play MP4 animation]

Himawari-8 Lower-level (7.3 µm), Mid-level (6.9 µm) and Upper-level (6.2 µm) Water Vapor images (above) showed a strong storm as it was rapidly intensifying south of the Aleutian Islands and moving into the Bering Sea during the 25-26 November 2017 period (surface analyses), producing hurricane force winds. Hourly surface wind gusts (knots) are plotted in red on the images.

GOES-15 (GOES-West) Visible (0.63 µm) images during the daylight hours of 25 and 26 November (below) offered a more detailed view of the storm. As with the water vapor images above, hourly surface wind gusts (knots) are plotted in red on the images.

GOES-15 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with hourly surface wind gusts (knots) plotted in red [click to play animation]

GOES-15 Visible (0.63 µm) images, with hourly surface wind gusts (knots) plotted in red [click to play animation]

A plot of hourly surface observations from Adak Island in the Aleutians is shown below. Peak wind gusts of 91 mph were reported on Adak Island and at Unalaska.

Time series of surface observations for Adak, Alaska [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface observations for Adak, Alaska [click to enlarge]

Also of note: the surface pressure at St. Paul Island dropped to unusually low levels as the storm moved into the Bering Sea.

Time series of surface observations from St. Paul Island [click to enlarge]

Time series of surface observations from St. Paul Island [click to enlarge]