Supercell thunderstorm producing large hail in the Naples, Italy area

September 5th, 2015 |

Meteosat-10 Infrared (10.8 µm) images [click to play animation]

Meteosat-10 Infrared (10.8 µm) images [click to play animation]

EUMETSAT Meteosat-10 Infrared (10.8 µm) images (above; click image to play animation) showed an isolated supercell thunderstorm which quickly developed over the eastern Mediterranean Sea and moved eastward across central Italy on 05 September 2015. This storm produced large in the Naples area (station identifier LIRN); hail was as large as 10 cm (3.94 inches) in diameter in the city of Pozzouli, which was just south of the vertex of the well-defined “enhanced-V” storm-top signature as seen in IR images from the SSEC RealEarth web map server site (below; click images to play animation). The coldest cloud-top IR brightness temperature was -73.5º C at 0900 UTC.

Meteosat-10 Infrared (10.8 µm) images [click to play animation]

Meteosat-10 Infrared (10.8 µm) images [click to play animation]

Meteosat-10 High Resolution Visible (0.8 µm) images (below; click image to play animation) revealed the tell-tale shadows cast by overshooting tops associated with the vigorous updrafts within this large and intense thunderstorm.

Meteosat-10 Visible (0.8 µm) images [click to play animation]

Meteosat-10 Visible (0.8 µm) images [click to play animation]

One Response to “Supercell thunderstorm producing large hail in the Naples, Italy area”

  1. Dziban says:

    As an American, I find the scale to be the most interesting part of this. Had this occurred over Nebraska, it’d be a good-sized storm. In Europe, the cell spans one nation, a sea, and parts of other nations.

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