Chan-Hom approaches the coast of China

July 10th, 2015 |


The video above shows 5 hours of Himawari-8 10.35 µm Infrared imagery from Typhoon Chan-Hom as it moves through the Yellow Sea towards the coast of China (original animated gif here; mp4 here). The location of Shanghai is indicated in the first frame, and this blog post talks about the history of typhoon landfalls near Shanghai. The appearance of the storm in the animation above is relatively constant.

Himawari-8 10.35 µm infrared imagery, 1447-2002 UTC on 6 July 2015 (Click to animate)

Himawari-8 6.2 µm (top), 6.9 µm (middle) and 7.3 µm (bottom) water vapor infrared imagery, 0000 UTC 8 July 2015 – 1500 UTC 10 July 2015 (click to animate)

The three water vapor channels from Himawari-8, above, over the course of the past 3 days show a steady northwestward motion and a decrease in the cold cloud tops surrounding the storm, consistent with the weakening that has been observed after peak intensity at ~1500 UTC on July 9. Typhoon Nangka remains southeast of Chan-Hom; Typhoon Linfa has dissipated after having made landfall over south China. Chan-Hom’s path (below) is over progressively colder water and significant intensification is not expected before landfall.

Sea-Surface Temperatures over the Yellow Sea, along with Chan-Hom's past and projected path (Click to enlarge)

Sea-Surface Temperatures over the Yellow Sea, along with Chan-Hom’s past and projected path (click to enlarge)

A DMSP SSMIS 85 GHz microwave image at 0946 UTC on 10 July, below, showed that Category 3 Typhoon Chan-Hom was undergoing an eyewall replacement cycle as the small inner eyewall was being replaced by a much larger outer eyewall. Also on the image are 1244 UTC Metop ASCAT surface scatterometer winds, which displayed a large area with winds in the 50-59.9 knot range along the western periphery of the tropical cyclone.

DMSP SSMIS microwave image at 0946 UTC, and Metop ASCAT winds at 1244 UTC (click to enlarge)

DMSP SSMIS microwave image at 0946 UTC, and Metop ASCAT winds at 1244 UTC (click to enlarge)

Leave a Reply