A mid-tropospheric atmospheric bore viewed by GOES-15, GOES-14, and GOES-13

May 16th, 2015 |

GOES-15 (left), GOES-14 (center), and GOES-13 (right) 6.5 µm water vapor channel images [click to play animation]

GOES-15 (left), GOES-14 (center), and GOES-13 (right) 6.5 µm water vapor channel images [click to play animation]

An elongated north-to-south oriented atmospheric bore was observed on GOES-15 (GOES-West), GOES-14, and GOES-13 (GOES-East) 6.5 µm water vapor channel images (above; click to play animation; also available as an MP4 movie file) on the morning of 16 May 2015. This bore feature was located in the area where strong westerly to southwesterly mid-tropospheric winds were impinging upon a consolidating dryline — this dryline later moved eastward and acted as the focus for severe thunderstorms across Texas (SPC storm reports). GOES-14 had been activated to perform Super Rapid Scan Operations for GOES-R (SRSOR) duties beginning on 18 May.

Note that there were no parallel cloud rolls present on the corresponding GOES-15/14/13 0.63 µm visible channel imagery (below) — so this gravity wave bore feature was forming in clear air.

GOES-15 (left), GOES-14 (center), and GOES-13 (right) 0.63 µm visible and 6.5 µm water vapor channel images

GOES-15 (left), GOES-14 (center), and GOES-13 (right) 0.63 µm visible and 6.5 µm water vapor channel images

A comparison of 12 UTC El Paso, Texas (yellow) and Midland, Texas (cyan) rawinsonde data (below) showed the differences in vertical moisture profile to the west and to the east of the bore feature — especially in the 500-600 hPa layer, where a good deal of the signal contributing to the overall water vapor brightness temperature was originating from.

El Paso and Midland, Texas rawinsonde data profiles

El Paso and Midland, Texas rawinsonde data profiles

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